Eastside 10k

Vancouver Combo Pack Savings for 2018

By | Eastside 10k, Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

For those thinking ahead to the 2018 running season on the West Coast, Canada Running Series is excited to announce some exclusive savings through the Vancouver Combo Pack!

Scotiabank Vancouver Half

$ 69

Early BirdDate – June 24, 2018
Regular price – $120


Under Armour Eastside 10k

$ 34

Early BirdDate – September 15, 2018
Regular Price – $60


Vancouver Combo PackBest Value

$ 92.70

Combo RateSave an extra 10% on both the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon and Under Armour Eastside 10k
Regular Price – $180


Scotiabank Vancouver 5k

$ 34

Early BirdDate – June 24, 2018
Regular Price – $60


Under Armour Eastside 10k

$ 34

Early BirdDate – September 15, 2018
Regular Price – $60


Vancouver Combo PackBest Value

$ 61.20

Combo RateSave an extra 10% on both the Scotiabank Vancouver 5k and Under Armour Eastside 10k
Regular Price – $120


Don’t miss out on the best pricing for 2018!
Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k – June 24, 2018
Under Armour Eastside 10k – September 15, 2018

*When registering for both the June and September races together, your registration for each event is automatically discounted by an extra 10%. The combo rate is also valid for the June 5k + September 10k combination. This discount is only valid on purchases made through the Combo Pack registration form and cannot be retroactively applied to existing, separate registrations.

**A discounted Combo Pack will continue to be available into 2018, but prices for both the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon and 5k will increase at midnight (PST) on January 11th, meaning the price of the Combo Pack will also increase accordingly.

How to Fuel Your Training Runs

By | Eastside 10k, Edmonton 10k, General, Nutrition, Racing Strategy, Scotiabank Vancouver Half, Uncategorised | No Comments

By Kim Doerkson

Regardless of whether you’re training for a road or a trail race, if you’re racing for over an hour, it is worth looking into how to fuel your training runs.  It may seem counterintuitive to eat during a run, especially if one of your goals is weight loss.  When the time spent running increases, it’s beneficial to have some kind of fuel to keep energy levels up.  Think of it like driving a car: if the tank is full, there’s no risk or fear of the vehicle breaking down; on the other hand, if the gas level gets low, it could damage the engine and leave you stranded on the side of the road.  The same is true for running.

So what is the best thing to eat during a run to avoid hitting the wall / bonking?  Like anything, it’s personal, but there these are a few go-to’s for runners:

  • Gels. These are widely available at any running or outdoor sports store and are the most common sources of fuel during races.  Essentially just little packets of sugary goo, gels are an easily digestible sugar source that can also include electrolytes and / or caffeine depending on the type.  There is a large selection of flavours, and they’re conveniently pocket-sized, making them the most runner-friendly.
  • Chews / Chomps: Exactly like they sound, chews are the runner’s version of gummy candy.  Much like gels, they are made with sugar and can have electrolytes and / or caffeine to help boost your energy levels during a run.  Unlike gels, chews require a bit more work: they needed to be chewed (hence the name), and more of them need to be consumed to match the caloric intake of a gel.  Typically 4 chews are equivalent to 1 gel; this is great if you prefer to eat throughout the run, and not just in bursts like you would with gels.  Just make sure to try a number of types are some get stuck in your teeth more than others!
  • Candy: Sugar-highs in children after eating sugar is the result runners are looking for; but maybe not to the extreme of the sugar-crash and crying after.  Most people have a favourite candy, so it’s a good start to fueling during the run.  Bringing wine gums, or any gummy candy keeps blood sugars up if they start to falter, and taste good at the same time.  Their only downfall is that they’re straight-up sugar.  Chews and gels will have a mix of electrolytes in them too which helps to keep electrolyte balance in check when sweating out salts on a run.
  • Dried fruit: Simple and natural. Taking a ziplock bag of dried dates, figs, raisins etc. is a great option while out for a long run.  Natural fruit sugars are readily accepted by most stomachs as an easily digestible fuel source.
  • Energy balls: These are most common during big train runs as there is more opportunity for slower paces while trekking up hill, and typically take longer than a road run due to technical terrain and elevation changes. Easy to make at home, energy balls consist of a mixture of dried fruit, nut butters, chocolate, coconut, and various seeds.  All natural ingredients with good fats, sugars, and a little protein goes a long way when out for a long time!

For all of these options, practice goes a long way.  Don’t show up to race day and decide to take a gel or eat during the race if you haven’t practiced in training.  It takes time to get your body used to fuelling while running, so include it into your training plan.  Also be sure to research what in-race fuel is available and if it’s not what you’re used to, make sure to pack what your need before getting onto the start line.

The Importance of Running Communities

By | Community Leaders, Eastside 10k, General, Newsletter, Scotiabank Vancouver Half, Training Tips, Uncategorised | No Comments

By Kara Leinweber, Ultra Runner

We are road runners, trail runners, elite and amateur runners. Some of us are 5k runners and others are  100 mile finishers. Whether you run fast or slow or in-between, we are all runners; we all chase post run glow, runners high and celebrations with new friends at the finish line. We are part of incredible run communities and crave connection with like minded individuals.

I love crushing both road and trail miles and compete in several road and ultra trail events each season. I am also the Race Director for The Lewiston Ultra (; a new event to celebrate community, connection and adventure. I am wild about run community and want to create opportunity to connect to something bigger, experience the power of community, float on gorgeous trails and take in an incredible finish line celebration. When we allow ourselves to be supported and support others, we have incredibly clear moments to push further and reach a higher level of focus in run.

Training on road and trail can be daunting and the mental toughness, commitment and accountability can be isolating. While I do complete many training runs solo in the pain cave, many of my training miles will be shared with running partners and run clubs. This has given opportunities to connect with runners that share the same pace, training ideas, gather the latest & greatest on run gear and create forever friendships. When you’re spending hours on the road or trails with a run buddy, you’re bound to chat about anything and everything. When I race ultras and run alongside a new friend for hours, we start sharing things that I wouldn’t even share with my closest of friends. You fight through the challenges together and there is nothing sweeter than rising up to be part of each other’s race success. I swear it is better than therapy. For all these reasons, I included an option in The Lewiston Ultra for relay runners to complete as many legs as they fancy with their relay team or with a soloist. I want to encourage the incredible bonds that are formed over the miles.

Stop by your local run store to connect with local run clubs and find out about race events. I have joined more run clubs that I can count and most will post the distance, route and pace prior so you know what your running into.  There are several types of run clubs: recreational, trail, triathlon, marathon, ultra marathon, track, stroller, etc. Run clubs are welcoming, encouraging to new members and ready to share stories and the runventure journey. Get out there and find your run community.



What can proper coaching do for you?

By | Eastside 10k, Edmonton 10k, Scotiabank Charity Challenge, Scotiabank Vancouver Half, Training Tips | No Comments

In a world where everything is available right at your fingertips, it seems normal to consult the internet for a training plan to prepare for an upcoming race.  However, these programs are cookie cutter methods based on norms that don’t take into consideration the uniqueness of the individuals that use them.  So what does proper coaching offer that a run-of-the-mill program doesn’t?

“With proper coaching, an athlete just might discover the best version of themselves, or they might start to let go of all those heavy expectations that they carry around. And through this process they will learn more about themselves. Proper coaching allows an athlete to make clear choices and carve out a path to where they want to go. Proper coaching builds the bridge between who the athlete is today, and who they will be. Proper coaching filters and flows into every area of an athlete’s life so that all of the practicing, resting, recovering, training, racing, and dreaming is purposeful. With proper coaching, we grow and get better.” – Kate Gustafson, Mile2Marathon Coaching.

Not only do coaches provide one-on-one coaching, they usually form a group of athletes that can train together.  This not only ensures that the athletes are provided guidance, but they’re also supplied with a team that gives a team-like dynamic in a very solo sport.  This community supports, pushes, and enhances those who are involved.

The words of Coach Kate from Mile2Marathon in Vancouver eloquently explains the benefit of having a coach that can guide an athlete on their running journey.  Having someone understand the ebbs and flows of the athlete’s life, commitments, vices, and dreams is crucial.  Accountability to a coach, to one’s own goals, and to the betterment of one’s skills, is something that a generalized program from the internet won’t offer.  A coach can help make the solitude of training become a camaraderie, through the rapport a coach-athlete relationship cultivates.

Ryan Chilibeck joins Canada Running Series as Western Race Director

By | Community Leaders, Eastside 10k, Newsletter, Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

VANCOUVER. January 30th, 2018. Canada Running Series is delighted to announce the appointment of Ryan Chilibeck, who will join the team as Race Director, CRS West, replacing Clif Cunningham. Ryan’s first day will be tomorrow, January 31st, though Clif will continue full-time until the summer as part of a smooth transition.

“After 17 years, we’re sad to see Clif move on in search of new adventures,” said President Alan Brookes, “but thrilled to have someone with Ryan’s combined running, community and business experience on board to continue to build on the success of the events.”

Ryan ChilibeckA lifetime sportsperson, Ryan turned to running in 2010, and got the “race experience” bug when he signed up for Canada Running Series’ Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon in 2014. That was also the year he founded East Van Run Crew:

“Until 2014, I typically ran alone,” he recalls. “Then one of my friends was running with Parkdale Roadrunners in Toronto and I couldn’t stop watching his social media feed to see what was going on. I looked around Vancouver and didn’t see anything that really captured the energy of this new running movement that they were bringing to the streets every week. In the lead up to my 2014 Scotia Half, EVRC was founded over social media, to a lukewarm reception. From there, things have just snowballed into what EVRC is today…a large, dynamic, inviting, open-door, community-building and thirsty group of people who also like to run.

Once this social aspect of running came into my life, it gave me another thing to look forward to every week: a new circle of friends and a creative output that no job could not offer me at the time. We were able to raise money for charities, jump on social media to connect with runners across the globe, host group events in our own city and represent our run crews at races around the world.”

From 2012 to 2016, Ryan also gained invaluable business experience establishing and managing a flourishing Famoso Pizza franchise in East Vancouver that also helped sponsor races and act as a popular location for crew runs, post-run pizza and beer, as well as supporting a wide range of community-based charities. He also coordinated and oversaw the training of new Famoso partners and their management teams, and re-vamped and refreshed the music offerings at 29 Famoso locations across Canada.

Ryan has spent the past year in Edmonton where he launched and managed the Northern Alberta Trail Run Series.

“Bringing a new Race Series to Edmonton was an incredibly rewarding experience. I was able to use my previous racing knowledge to coordinate the entire runner-experience from registration to finish line. There is no better feeling than seeing a lofty vision and months’ worth of planning come to reality. The only downside was that I never got to race in any of them! I’m really looking forward to bringing my personal experiences and talents to the amazing structure that Clif, Tom and the rest of the CRS team has worked hard to create across the country.”

Ryan will be joined on the Canada Running Series West team by Jen Cerullo and Ron Denischuk, two high-energy event professionals, as Event Manager and Operations Manager, respectively. Jen has worked on many Vancouver-area events including prominent roles with lululemon’s Seawheeze, the Rock ‘n Roll Vancouver Half marathon and the First Half Half Marathon, as well as with CRS on the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon in a range of volunteer-management, course, venue and “people” areas. Ron has worked with CRS under Tom Skinner for 5 years, as well as on the Sun Run and other major events. A UBC Business graduate, he is eager to step up as Tom moves on to a new challenge with HUB Cycling. Like Clif, though, Tom will be there in the transition to support the Scotia Half and the Under Armour Eastside 10k in race-week roles.

“We’re really excited about 2018, from Vancouver to Toronto and Montreal,” said Brookes. “And we’re looking forward to seeing the running community out in force to give Clif and Tom a royal send-off, and be part of the new energy, excitement and innovation that Ryan and his team will bring. We’re all building this together.”

Canada Running Series [CRS] is the nation’s premier running circuit with 7 events: 4 in Toronto, 2 in Vancouver and 1 in Montreal.  It annually attracts some 60,000 participants and raises more than $6 million for some 320 mostly-local charities. The Series includes the IAAF Gold Label Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, and the Scotiabank Vancouver Half marathon, the only event in Canada to receive “Inspire Gold” certification from the Council for Responsible Sport in Oregon for its exemplary practice of sustainability. Since 1999, CRS has gained international recognition for innovation and organization. We are passionately committed to staging great experiences for runners of all levels from Canadian Olympians and International stars, to healthy lifestyle people and charity runners; and to making sport part of sustainable communities and the city-building process.  Our mission is “building community through the sport of running”.

Under Armour Eastside 10k Recap

By | Eastside 10k | No Comments

The Under Armour Eastside 10K was an amazing success! It was great to see so many runners come out and support the Eastside community and we couldn’t have asked for better conditions for the run.

Here are some of the race-day highlights:

In case you missed it, Lanni Marchant appeared on Breakfast Television Vancouver on Friday to talk about the Eastside 10K and how to go from the couch to a 10k in no time. Click Here to watch the segment. Lanni also made an appearance at race packet pick-up on Friday to chat with runners and sign autographs for runners in attendance.

Here are some race day stats:

There were approximately 2,800 participants in the race with family and friends cheering along the route!

The top male finisher was Geoff Martinson with a time of 30:00. Justin Kent and Kevin Coffey finished with times of 30:17 and 30:38 respectively to round out the top three.

The top female finisher was Sarah Inglis with a time of 33:45. Leslie Sexton and Natasha Wodak finished with times of 34:00 and 34:32 respectively to round out the top three.

Under Armour athlete and Canadian marathon and half-marathon record holder Lanni Marchant placed an encouraging fourth in 34:37 as she continues her comeback from illness.

Close to $17,000 has been raised to date from the fundraising efforts of our competitors for the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, the Greater Vancouver Food Bank, and PHS Community Services Society.

Thank you for making the Under Armour Eastside 10K such an incredible experience. See you again next year! Please share your race day pics on Instagram using #UAEastside10K.

Sarah Inglis and Geoff Martinson win the Under Armour Eastside 10K

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Sarah Inglis and Geoff Martinson win the Under Armour Eastside 10K

VANCOUVER, September 16,2017 – Geoff Martinson cruised to a comfortable victory in 30:00 at this morning’s Under Armour Eastside 10k in Vancouver.  Falkirk, Scotland’s Sarah Inglis claimed a surprise win in 33:45 in a thrilling women’s race.

A sold-out record crowd of 2,800 runners toured historic Gastown and the streets of Eastside Vancouver under sunny skies and perfect 13 degrees Celsius weather.  The fifth year of the race featured a new course that started and ended at the iconic Woodward’s building.       

Martinson took a lead pack of five through a leisurely first kilometre in 3 minutes and 2 seconds. He injected a little pace in the third kilometre and the group was whittled down to three: Martinson, Justin Kent and Kevin Coffey. Coffey didn’t survive the impressive hills between the 5 and 6 kilometres and the race came down to a dual between Martinson and Kent.  Martinson made his final surge at 8km to claim the victory. This is the second time Martinson, a former Canadian 1,500m international, has won the race.  Kent held on for second in 30:17, with Kevin Coffey third in 30:38. 

On the women’s side, last year’s champion Leslie Sexton of London, Ontario led through the first kilometre before Canadian Olympian Natasha Wodak and Sarah Inglis moved to the front and dropped her.  The Ontarian, who has been running over 200km a week in preparation for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon next month, pulled them back on the big hills after 5km, but couldn’t contain Inglis’ speed on the downhill final 2km.  At the line, Sexton was happy to be just 15 seconds back while Wodak held on for third in 34:32.  Under Armour athlete and Canadian marathon and half-marathon record holder Lanni Marchant came home an encouraging fourth in 34:37 as she continues her comeback from illness.

“I am really happy to win the race with a personal best today,” said Sarah Inglis.  “It was a great field of women this year with Natasha, Rachel and Leslie and I felt strong on the hills and great during the race. I’ve been training really well and I am looking forward to the Victoria half marathon in a couple of weeks.” 

The race was also an important fundraising event for three Eastside community charities: The Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, PHS Community Services Society, and the Greater Vancouver Food Bank. Combined, the 2,800 participants have already raised $17,000 and participants can continue to fundraise online until October 1st online at

“Thanks to everyone who was part of such a spectacular morning.  The sun shone brightly over the Eastside, the athletes up front put on a show for us, and a record crowd showed they cared about our community raising money with every step,” said Race Director Clifton Cunningham. “We couldn’t have had a better day.” 

Under Armour Eastside 10k top finisher’s results:

10km Male  
1. Geoff Martinson – Vancouver, BC
2. Justin Kent – Burnaby, BC
3. Kevin Coffey – Vancouver, BC
10km Female 
1. Sarah Inglis – Langley, BC
2. Leslie Sexton – London, ON
3. Natasha Wodak – North Vancouver, BC
Information and complete race results can be found at   
For more information on Canada Running Series events, please visit
About Under Armour Eastside 10k:
The Under Armour Eastside 10k is part of the prestigious Canada Running Series. As Vancouver’s premier fall 10k, it takes place in the Eastside, running for three Eastside embedded charities, with the great Eastside Community. 2,800 runners take to the streets each September to show their love for the heart of Vancouver. Canada Running Series is the nation’s premier running circuit with events in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal.  It annually attracts over 60,000 participants and raises more than $6 million for some 320 charities. Canada Running Series is strongly committed to staging great experiences for runners of all levels from first time runners, charity supporters and Canadian Olympians; and to making sport part of sustainable communities and the city-building process.  Our mission is “building community through running”. For more information please visit:
For media inquiries, please contact:    
Carolyn Abbass
Serena Vampa
Canada Running Series
Cell: 778-549-8329
 Photo credit: Mark Bates, Canada Running Series

Race Day Tips for #UAeastside10k

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Every year we’re joined by hundreds of new runners at the Under Armour Eastside 10k. We’ve taken some tips from the seasoned runners out there and come up with the ABC’s of how to set yourself up for a great race – both before and after the event.

While this guide is primarily aimed at new runners, it’s always good to refresh your memory even if you’ve been racing for decades! Also be sure to check out our Race Etiquette Page.

Before the Race

A – Know where you need to be and when

This may seem obvious, but it’s so often overlooked. You can save yourself a amount of stress on Race Day (and the days leading up to it) by knowing where to go and when. This includes knowing where to pick up your race package and bib number in the days leading up to the race, as well as how to get to the start line.

  • Package Pickup – ALL participants must pick up their race package and bib number at Package Pickup before Race Day. Package Pickup is located at the SFU Segal Building — 500 Granville St (Granville @ Pender) and is open on Friday September 15th from 11:30am to 6:30pm, and Saturday September 16th in the Woodwards Atrium from 7am-8am. More details here.
  • Start Line – The run will start and finish on Cordova Street, near the Woodward’s Development. Your best way to get to the Start Area is to take public transit. To plan your trip, click here and select your starting location then choose Transit direction. Woodward’s is a short walk from either Waterfront Station or Stadium Skytrain Station. The second best way to get there is to bike, as BEST will be providing a complimentary and secure Bike Valet right beside the Start/Finish Line.A reminder that road closures will be in effect for the event, so please leave extra travel time. Recommended routes into Downtown are Hastings Street, Georgia Street, and Cambie Street Bridge.Driving to the start line? The easiest access/parking option is to take Cambie Street northbound to Cordova, then turn right to access the parking garage off of Cordova Street. Note that this access route is only possible until 8:15am, after which Cordova Street will be fully closed for the start of the race. If you are dropping someone off, please do so on Hastings Street.For full road closures details click here.

B – Don’t do anything new! We mean it!

A common mistake is to try something new just before or on Race Day. This could be anything from wearing a new pair of shoes during the run to changing up your diet the day before. If you typically eat a simple pasta the night before your training runs, don’t try out that new sushi place around the corner on Friday night. If you don’t usually have coffee before your training runs, don’t go for a double espresso on Race Day morning. Stick with what works for you – from your meals to your running clothes to your morning routine.

C – Start in the right corral

What’s a corral? In order to give everyone their best experience on Race Day, runners are typically assigned into a corral based on their predicted finish time. At the #UAeastside10k all runners will self-assign themselves to a estimated finish time.  Speedsters can start at the front of the pack while walkers start further back. Please be respectful of other runners and line up according to your expected finish time, and be honest in your approximations. Please also be mindful of other runners who may need to pass you on course.  Keep in mind the race start closes 10 minutes after the scheduled start time.  Make sure you arrive on time.

Corral colour Est. finish time Start time
Black Elites  8:30am
RedRed Corral < 50min   8:30am
Yellow CorralYellow 50–58min   8:30am
BlueBlue Corral 58–66min   8:30am
GreenGreen Corral 66min +   8:30am

Corral details for the race here.

BONUS – use our Gear Check to store a bag of warm, dry (and less-sweaty) clothes for after the race. Your $2 donation will go to our Featured Charities.

During the Race

A – Make sure your bib number is on your front and visible

We use a bib-tag timing system, which means your timing chip is embedded in your bib number. In order for it to work properly and have your time recorded:

  • Do not remove the “bibTag” or foam spacer from your bib.
  • Do not fold your bib or excessively bend or twist the “bibTag”.
  • Wear your bib on your chest/abdomen. Do not wear on your back, side, leg or arm.
  • Do not cover your bib with clothing – always make sure it is completely visible.
  • Make sure you cross over the timing mat at both the Start Line and the Finish Line.
    ***Start Line will CLOSE 10min AFTER THE SCHEDULED START TIME ***

B – Start slow and stay even

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of Race Day and start out too fast. Do the opposite – start a little slower than your normal pace and gradually pick up your pace over the first kilometre. After that, try to keep an even pace throughout the race and save your extra energy for the final push to the Finish Line!

C – Be prepared for whatever Mother Nature brings

No one knows what the weather will be in September, so it’s important to be prepared for anything. If it’s hot, bring your own water, but we’ll also have plenty of aid stations on course, serving up both water and Gatorade. If you are using one of the aid stations:

  • When approaching a hydration station, move to the side of the road, grab your fluid/nutritional needs and keep moving. There will be multiple hydration tables so if the first table is busy KEEP MOVING.
  • There will be water refill stations for those runners carrying their own bottles.
  • Throw your used cup to the side of the road as close to the hydration station as possible, ideally in one of the marked bins. Drop your cup down by your waist so you don’t hit/splash another participant. Please don’t litter on the course after passing the last aid station garbage bin.
  • If you plan to stop at the aid station, move past the tables and pull off to the side of the road.
  • Say thank you to the volunteers!

After the Race

A – Keep moving

Collect your medal as you cross the Finish Line, then keep moving through the chute until you get to the Post-Race Recovery Area. Keep moving for at least 10 more minutes afterwards to gradually bring your heart rate down and help your legs flush out that lactic acid (this will prevent you from being stiff tomorrow).

B – Refuel and rehydrate

Right after the finish line we’ll have water and Gatorade for you to rehydrate with. Grab a cup and keep walking – there will be more in the Post-Race Recovery Area. A variety of snacks will be available in the Recovery Area, including bananas, bagels, Powerbar, cookies, juice, and yogurt. The carbs will help replenish your energy stores while a bit of protein will help rebuild your muscles. Make sure you eat something within 30 minutes of crossing the line.

There will also be an Under Armour stretching station after the Finish Line, so you’ll have a designated area to do a proper cool-down and post-race stretch!

C – Get warm and enjoy the Finish Area

After you’ve fueled up, stop by Gear Check to collect your spare clothes. Even on a sunny day, your core temperature will drop fast once you stop moving, especially when you’re still wearing sweaty clothes. Once you’ve done that, check out the Awards Ceremony (9:45am).

Post-race brunch is always key. There are many excellent restaurants in the area, including The Charles Bar that is putting on a special brunch from 9:30-11:30am. You must buy a ticket ahead of time, which will be given to you at package pickup. Click here to reserve your spot!

Congratulations! Now it’s time to start planning your next race – registration for the 2018 Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k, or the 2018 Under Armour Eastside 10k opens after the race on Saturday!

Race day etiquette & pacer information

By | Eastside 10k, Training Tips | No Comments

Race day is the most exciting part of any training build.  After months of workouts, long runs, and mentally preparing for a race all seems worth it when you finally get to pin your race bib on, and accomplish your goal.  To make a race the best experience possible, there are some race etiquette tips to keep in mind for the big day.

Before the race:

  • Read the website, entry form or other race information before contacting the race directly. All of the race details you need to know are probably there.
  • Respect entry restrictions. Check if the race permits wheelchairs or baby joggers, imposes a minimum age, or has time restrictions.
  • Pay attention to packet pickup hours. Do not show up at other times and expect to receive your race packet/number.
  • Carefully check your information at packet pickup. The time to correct any errors such as age, gender, or misspelling of your name is BEFORE the race.

Race day:

  • Keep your race bib visible. Pin your number on the FRONT of your shirt or outermost clothing. Announcers, photographers, timers and medics use it to help identify you.
  • Start in the correct corral. There is a reason why races ask for your predicted finishing time.  Slower runners and walkers should move into to the later corrals as their race bib indicates to avoid any congestion for faster runners trying to pass by. Arriving early doesn’t mean you can start at the front of the race. If you want to switch corrals, there are usually spots at package pickup to request that change.
  • Don’t make a fence.  It is incredibly frustrating to try and pass a large group of slower individuals who take up the entire width of the street during a race.  If you’re in a large group, respect other races, and stay two abreast.  If you’re walking, please remain behind the runners to avoid obstruction.
  • Pass on the left, stay to the right. If you’re speeding along, pass runners on their left. If you need to slow down, move to the right to allow others to easily pass. The first mile or so of a race can be crowded and sometimes you need to weave to pass people.  Just be aware of those around you.
  • Don’t stop dead in your tracks. If you need to stop for any reason move to the side.  Whether it’s an untied shoelace, your walk/run program, or an urgent phone call, don’t stop dead in your tracks. Look around, move to the side and slide back into the race when you’re ready.
  • Be mindful before taking mid-race photos. Many runners love documenting their journey, especially since selfies have become all the rage.  These are great mementos, but please step to the side when taking them. The last thing you want is another runner plowing through you and your phone shattering on the ground.
  • Don’t tune out. Portable headphone devices for iPods, MP3 players, phones etc are discouraged for your safety and the safety of others.  Blasting music in your ears can block out any verbal warnings/directions or sounds of vehicles/participants along the course. Be aware of your surroundings for your own safety, as well as for respecting others.
  • Be aware of other runners at water stops. If you’re skipping the water, run straight through the station and don’t crowd where the water is located.  If you need to wet your whistle, minimize congestion by grabbing quickly and move to the side once you’ve passed the water station volunteers before slowing down.
  • Listen to your body. If you’re not having a great day and decide to drop out, tell someone.  Sometimes race day doesn’t go as planned.  If you need to drop-out, be sure to tell a race volunteer so no one is looking for you afterwards.
  • Run through the finish line. Hundreds of runners are coming through behind you, so move towards the medals and snacks to avoid congestion in the finishing chute.
  • Share the post-race goodies.  After a race, the first thing runners see are the food tents.  While you’ve just burned a lot of calories during the race, remember that everyone else in the race has too.  Take one of each thing to allow every runner to replenish their energy once they cross the finish line.


Many races have a group of volunteers that run the race to help others reach their goals.  These pacers, sometimes known as pace bunnies, are a valuable tool for staying on target for your goal.  When following a pacer, always keep an eye on your own time as well, just in case.  At the Under Armour Eastside 10k, there are 15 pacers for a number of race times.  The pacers will have matching pacer kits on, and will hold a sign with their designated pace time on it.  Hop in to whatever group matches your personal goal and let the camaraderie of others help pull you along!  The pacers will be as follows:

  • 45:00 = Lucas & Tibor
  • 50:00 = Alan & Fergus
  • 55:00 = Kenny & Shannon
  • 60:00 = Karl, Mark & Andy
  • 65:00 = Kelsey & Olivia
  • 70:00 = Erika & Evgeny
  • 75:00 = Fiona & Maryam


Olympian Natasha Wodak Leads Field for Under Armour Eastside 10k

By | Eastside 10k, Elite Athletes | No Comments
by Paul Gains

Canadian Olympian Natasha Wodak heads a strong women’s field for the running of the Under Armour Eastside 10k, in Vancouver on Saturday September 16, though she is cautious about being considered the favourite.

The 35-year-old is coming off an excellent 10,000m performance at the 2017 IAAF World Championships – she finished 16th in a season best 31:55.47 – and then proceeded straight into a well-deserved rest period.

“I took a week off after the world track and field championships and have been doing some easy running.” she reveals. “It has been going well. I have been listening to my body and it is feeling good right now.”

Foot surgery last December left her playing catch up throughout the spring and summer leading to inconsistent performances. To add to the mix, she switched coaches and is now being guided by one of her heroes, 1984 Olympic 3,000m bronze medalist, Lynn Kanuka. In London she was inspired by the surprise appearance of Kanuka at the warmup track on the day of the 10000m final. The coach had only arrived in London hours before the race.

Two years ago, Wodak set an Eastside 10k event record of 33:04. She has a best 10k road time of 31:59 (Ottawa 2015) and also holds the Canadian 10,000m record of 31:41.59 which quali-fied her for the Rio Olympics. She was 22nd in the Rio 10,000m final. When she looks over the Eastside 10k field she points out that along with the ‘usual suspects’ there might be another sur-prise.

“Sarah Inglis is from Scotland and is training out here. She has been doing some training with me,” Wodak says of the graduate of Trinity Western University. “I wouldn’t be surprised if she runs low 33 or 33:30 so I am definitely going to not take her lightly either.”

Inglis finished just ahead of the Canadian at the Portland Tack Festival 5,000m in June so they are well aware of each other’s abilities. Rachel Cliff, who ran a personal best 10,000m (32:00.03 for 20th place) at the world championships is among the challengers along with marathoners Leslie Sexton, the defending Eastside 10k champion, and Lanni Marchant.

Marchant, the Canadian marathon record holder at 2:28:00, signed an endorsement contract with Under Armour in May but suffered kidney stones which required surgery. Since then she has kept her cards close to her chest and pulled out of the world championships where she had been entered in the 10,000m. Still, Wodak says she will underestimate no one.

“I think it’s going to be a really great competitive race,” Wodak continues. “I feel like we are all in the same boat, Rachel and I coming back from worlds and taking some time off, Lanni coming off a bit of an inconsistent spring and summer, so I don’t know where she is at. Leslie had a big injury in the winter and had a slow comeback. Obviously, I want to win in my hometown.”

The men’s race features 2015 Eastside champion Geoff Martinson of the BC Endurance Project a former Canadian 1,500m international, who has been tearing up the roads the past few years. He has a best of 29:26 (2016) on the roads but ran 28:48.33 on the track in June of this year in-dicating he has much potential at this distance.

The race which has been sold out for a couple of weeks, doubles as the BC championships hence the excellent turnout of local talent. Justin Kent (30:26 personal best) and Kevin Coffey (30:13) should also be contention for the prize money. The race winners will receive $1,000 with second and third earning $600 and $400 respectively. The top BC runners will collect a further $400, $300 and $200.

There is even more money at stake. Since the Under Armour Eastside 10k is part of the seven race Canada Running Series there are points to be had. The winner here will earn 60 points, and, with Wodak currently in the lead thanks to dominant victories at the Race Roster Spring Run Off 8k and Toronto Waterfront 10k earlier this year, she can solidify her grasp on the over-all title – and $5000 prize money.

For a complete start list see:

For more information on the run see: