Trio of Guinness World Records Title Seekers to Run Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

By | Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

By Paul Gains

In addition to the formidable cache of elite runners from around the world, the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, each year, attracts thousands running for charities and many more simply committed to the challenge of completing the distance faster than ever.

Then there are those hearty souls seeking a Guinness World Records title.

Michal Kapral set a world ‘joggling’ – juggling balls while running – marathon record ten years ago in Toronto when he completed the distance in 2 hours 50 minutes and 12 seconds. That was with three balls.

Owner of three Guinness World Records currently, Fastest 10km joggling with three objects (male) 36:27, Fastest half marathon joggling with three objects (male) 1:20:40, and Fastest marathon joggling with three objects (male) 2:50:12, on October 22nd, 2017 he will attempt to set the record for Fastest marathon joggling with five objects (male).

“I have upped the ante big time with this attempt to do five ball,” Kapral says laughing. “There is no current Guinness World Records title.

“As far as I know there is only one other person who has done a marathon while joggling five. That was back in 1993 a guy named Billy Dillon who was a kind of a five ball juggling pioneer He ran the New York Marathon in 7 hours 7 minutes. And he was a very fast runner. So you can see just how much harder it is to joggle with five.”

It has taken Kapral, who points to a personal best marathon of 2:30:40, almost six months to learn the pattern of juggling with five balls. He practices each lunch hour at Toronto’s Varsity Stadium, much to the amusement of the university football team, which also trains around that time. Learning how far ahead he must toss each ball to catch and transfer between hands has proven much more challenging.

“With the five balls I have discovered there is no such thing as an easy pace,” he explains. “Immediately my heart rate shoots up. It is really, really tiring. It is also addictive. It’s super fun when you have three balls in the air. It is a ton of fun but definitely this is going to be by far the hardest record I have tried.”

Kapral will be accompanied by his joggling rival Zach Warren during the Toronto race who will act as spotter so that he doesn’t interfere with other runners. As a precaution Kapral usually runs on the opposite side of the road to others. He has chosen to fundraise for Sick Kids Foundation, an official charity of the Scotiabank Charity Challenge.

A year ago Daniel Janetos ran Toronto wearing a chef’s costume the entire distance. He recorded a time of 3:56:21 to earn the Guinness World Records title of Fastest marathon dressed as a chef. This year Janetos, who owns the annual Mac and Cheese Festival at Ontario Place, intends to chase the record for the Fastest half marathon achieved in a chef’s costume.

“It’s a little bit goofy, I get it,” he declares. “Really the number one thing is to raise money for charity. It’s the National Wildlife Rehabilitation Foundation.

“These guys have been a grassroots agency for 25 years and with my help were able to formalize into a foundation. We were able to get some funding for them. My running helps them to take care of animals.”

Janetos is aiming to run 1 hour 45 minutes for the 21km race to claim the record title. That’s a tall order when his personal best for the distance is roughly that. Add such ingredients as a 9 pound pot and chef’s clothes and it’s certainly not as easy as someone might think. He trains as part of a group called Food Runners which aims to improve the health and fitness levels of people in the food industry.

“I try to make sure I am out at least three hours a week in the early stages. Then I follow a more rigorous program that our coach puts together for us,” he explains.

“I do train with my girlfriend Kate Boyle, She usually stops running with me when I put on my chef uniform. She is a little more low key. As soon as I put the chef’s hat on she is out.”

Running in a chef’s uniform is mind boggling. How about running 42.2km wearing a lumberjack costume complete with heavy boots? That’s what Dan Grant will attempt to do. The Torontonian has applied to attempt the Guinness World Records title of Fastest marathon dressed as a lumberjack (male) and has agreed to the costume they have assigned: a plaid/flannel short sleeved shirt, suspenders, denim pants, a stocking cap or beanie, lace up outdoor boots and an inflatable axe.

“I’ve run three marathons in the past couple years,” Grant reveals, “as well as a 60k run to Hamilton last month, so the distance doesn’t scare me. I am little worried about how much it’s going to slow and weigh me down if it rains during the STWM.”

At the Toronto Waterfront 10k on June 17th Grant finished in 44:53, claiming to be below his best. He had run another 10k race thirty six hours before.

Another concern for Grant is that he is a vegan and wants to find non leather boots in which to run.

Grant is growing a beard to further ‘grow into the part.’ He reports that Great Lakes Brewery has agreed to supply his post training fueling with a generous supply of Canuck Pale Ale. A year ago the owner of the brewery shaved Grant’s head in a fundraising event for Sick Kids Foundation. He will run Toronto Waterfront Marathon to raise funds for Good Foot Delivery one of the official charities of the Scotiabank Charity Challenge.

City marathons embrace runners of all descriptions and Toronto is no different. The inclusion of this trio of record seekers certainly enhances the enjoyment of this annual IAAF Gold Label event.

Interested in attempting a Guinness World Record at this year’s race? Please contact Jenna Pettinato, Canada Running Series’ Manager of Communications at jenna@canadarunningseries.com or visit our website: http://www.torontowaterfrontmarathon.com/guinness-world-records/

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SVHM 17

Kangogo & Tessier take tactical wins at 2017 Scotia Half

By | Elite Athletes, Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

VANCOUVER, BC. June 25th. Lethbridge’s Kip Kangogo (65:35) and Toronto’s Lyndsay Tessier (77:00) raced to emphatic victories in the 19th edition of the Scotiabank Vancouver Half marathon, presented by Asics, ahead of 4,229 participants this morning. Another 2,506 took part in the accompanying 5K. The total, sold-out crowd of 6,735 were drawn to the magnificent scenery of the Pacific Northwest and the finish in world-famous Stanley Park, from 9 Canadian provinces, 26 American states and 27 countries around the world. Combined, the runners also raised and impressive $970,000 for 76 mostly-local charities in the Scotiabank Charity Challenge.

SVHM 17The summerlike conditions showed one of the world’s most-scenic half marathons at its best, but led to tactical races up front. It was 19c for the 7:30am start of the “Scotia Half” start at the University of British Columbia at 7:30am. A group of 4 immediately broke away from the field, led by Canada’s 2012 Olympic marathoner Dylan Wykes, with Kangogo, Lakefield, Ontario’s Thomas Toth and Tristan Woodfine from Guelph’s Speed River TFC tucked in behind. Two initial three-minute kilometres got rid of Woodfine who drifted back on tired legs, and the pace slowed to consistent 3:10s as Wykes kept things moving along. Toth, who had already put in over 200 kilometres this week as he prepares to represent Canada in the IAAF World Championships marathon in London in August, was gone by 8k (24:51).  It then turned into a thoroughly absorbing cat and mouse contest between two wily veterans. Kangogo had already won the event an impressive 5 times, Wykes once in 2014 (with Kangogo 2nd). The pair continued down through Spanish Banks, Jericho Beach, Point Grey and into Kitsilano with Wykes doing all the leading, and Kangogo in his footsteps behind. 10k was passed in 30:47 and 15k in 46:33 before Kangogo moved out to test Wykes’ race fitness around Kits Point at 17k. At 18k, going onto the challenging uphill over Burrard Bridge, the Albertan made his signature, decisive move that has given him so many victories on the course and it was over quickly. “My training has been coming along really nicely,” Kangogo said. “I was happy with my preparation and I planned to make my move at 18k on the bridge. I had won the Canadian Half marathon Championships 3 weeks ago in Calgary and I was ready. I love this race and am glad to come back anytime.” Despite dropping off to finish 18 seconds back (65:53) Wykes was also pleased with his performance. After battling injuries for 4 years and starting a family, he ran a steady, controlled effort. “It’s great to be back racing,” he said. “Right now I’ve still only got one gear, but watch out for me in the Fall!” Toth crossed the line a distant third in 68:02, with Woodfine another minute back (69:03).

SVHM 17 TessierThe women’s race produced a surprise winner in Lyndsay Tessier from Toronto’s Black Lungs club, ahead of strong pre-race favourite Dayna Pidhoresky (78:10) of Vancouver. Pidhoresky was coming off a breakthrough performance at the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon just 4 weeks ago – a PB of 2:36:08 that also earned her a place on the Canadian team to the World Championships. “It was tough out there,” she said. “It was hot. The plan was to do a tempo workout and I thought that might be good enough to win today, but it wasn’t. Lyndsay really deserved to win. I’ve only had a couple of workouts since Ottawa, and I was worried if I pushed too hard it might set me back, and I’d miss some important training for London.” Pidhoresky got off to her typical quick start and was well clear at 3k which she passed in 10:02. But Tessier remained steady, gradually hauling her in. Tessier caught up around 8k, and the pair battled back and forth until 13k when Tessier made the move, to eventually win by over a minute. “Early on I just tried to keep the green shorts in sight,” said Tessier. “I’m not good on downhills, and Dayna got away from me on the downhill from 8k to 9k, but I caught up to her again by 10k. I do much better on the uphills and I moved away on the rise from Jericho at 13k. Burrard Street bridge was really a throat punch at the end but once I got over it I just held on.” Washington State’s Courtney Olsen was 3rd in 80:47.

Following the race, Race Director Clif Cunningham presented Kangogo with 6 rings to represent his 6 victories on the course, after several years of the former college All-American repeatedly joking about “where’s my rings?!” A live band, a teeming “Charity Village” and all around good vibes with snow-capped mountains and the Pacific Ocean as a backdrop, rounded out a spectacular Vancouver running experience.

After a summer hiatus the Canada Running Series resumes in Vancouver, with the Under Armour Eastside 10k on September 16th. http://canadarunningseries.com/vancouver-eastside-10k/

Full results from today at http://canadarunningseries.com/scotiabank-vancouver-half-marathon/the-weekend/#results-and-photos

SVHM 17SVHM 17SVHM 17SVHM 17

Adjusting your race goals when things get hot

By | Racing Strategy, Training Tips | No Comments

Racing in the heat can be tough: you sweat more; your body temperature is higher; and your perceived exertion goes up for paces that are usually manageable.  The heat throw a wrench into your plans, both mentally and physically, especially if all of your training has done in cooler weather.  Most runners have race day plans for their pacing, various race strategies, and nutrition, but it’s rare that people plan for significant weather changes.  While you won’t be able to change the weather, there are ways to adjust to prepare yourself in a short amount of time:

If you’re travelling to run in a hot race, try to arrive to your destination as soon as you can.  Taking a few days to acclimate will make a big difference come race day.  The body needs time to adjust to the heat, especially if you’re coming from a cooler climate.

When temperatures go above 20C , the negative effects of heat start to amplify, so the least amount of exposure to the heat and sun possible one race day is ideal.  Cut your warmup short and do just enough to get your muscles moving and ready to ease into race pace. If you there’s an opportunity to keep cool in the shade, take it.  Also, think about bringing a towel to soak in cool water or ice, to place on your neck/hands in an effort to keep your core temperature down.  You’ll feel more comfortable at a cooler temperature and ready to run fast as a result.

Once the gun goes off, try to start at a slower pace and adjust your goals.  The heat can negatively affect the race, but it won’t necessarily sabotage it entirely. If you’re sensible in your approach, a fast time is possible, it just might not be a personal best.  By going out a little bit slower than initially intended will keep you in check, and increase the likelihood of finishing the race strong.

Throughout the race understand that your fueling strategies may have to change.  Your body will be working hard to regulate your temperature, so the fuel that you’re used to may not sit well in your gut.  However, drinking a fuelling is key so do your best to consume early and often.  Taking in nutrition while you’re feeling good in the first half of the race, will help you in the latter part of the run if things start to go sideways.  Taking even just a sip or two or water/sports drink at every station will help to get you to the finish line.

Adjusting your race plans and goals when the heat sets in can be enough to salvage a race.  Throughout training be sure to plan for any and every kind of mishap, it can make a difference when it really matters!

Newcomer Thomas Toth To Face Strong Field at Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon

By | Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

By Paul Gains

Hailstones and a strong wind plagued runners in the Hamburg Marathon this past April 23rd, yet a little known Canadian, making his debut at the distance no less, prevailed to finish under the 2017 IAAF World Championship qualifying standard by two seconds.

With his 2:18:58 Thomas Toth earned a place on the Canadian team bound for London this coming August.

The 25 year old from Lakefield, Ontario seemed destined to be just another Canadian runner lost in the US collegiate system after running for Cameron University in Oklahoma for four years. But he emerged last year to run an eye catching 64:26 at the Houston Half Marathon before going on to win the 2016 Canadian Half Marathon championship in Calgary.

Being named last week to the Canadian team ensures he will be someone to follow in coming years.

“Of course I feel very honoured,” he declared. “Coming into this year (the World Championships) was a goal of mine, especially in the fall. I didn’t expect to have the race that I did in Hamburg where a couple of things weren’t quite in my favour:  the weather and nutrition mainly.

“To get 2:18:58 and only be under the standard by two seconds was extremely stressful. But to be named is just such a great honour. But the last five weeks I was very stressed-out waiting to see if anyone else would squeak under the standard because, if they made the standard, they would essentially knock me out. I am excited and I am honoured.”

Besides the impediment of poor weather conditions, Toth had to deal with a mix-up of bottles at some of the feeding stations. Early in the race he tried to go with some of the elites but wound up running alone for much of the race. No wonder he believes he can run much faster.

Toth has confirmed he will be running the Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon this Sunday, June 25th. The race is the fourth in the 2017 Canada Running Series.

“It will be more or less a fitness test,” says Toth. “I have been in a hard training block and to get out there in Vancouver with some other great athletes to push me to sort of test the waters. It’s where I can get the wheels going and see where I am at because, at that point, I will have only a month left of training left for London. So it will be more of a test than anything.

“I have definitely improved a lot. There have been workouts where I think ‘I know I have run 64 and I can now get close to 63’ that is more or less where my mindset is. I do believe 64:26 is a very strong time but I would like to get under 64 in the right conditions.”

Two years ago, after graduating from Cameron University, he and his wife moved to Plaistow, New Hampshire where he trains alone. Without a shoe sponsor – he says he contacted most of the major companies but without success – he earns money through a personal training/coaching business.

His training programs are still written by Coach Zach Johnson of Cameron University. The pair communicate daily by email and by texting.

“I am still coached by Zach Johnson who recruited me out of high school and who has done just an incredible job keeping me healthy and progressing,” Toth reveals. “I don’t need much guidance in terms of having someone giving me splits or being down my throat. I have always been very motivated. I just put in the work and ask him for guidance.”

The event record of 63:10 for the Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon was set in 2007 by Patrick Nthwia of Kenya, and although there have been minor tweaks on the course it remains basically from the University of British Columbia to Stanley Park.

Toth will come up against defending champion Kip Kangogo a five-time winner (2009, 2010, 2011, 2013 and 2016), who recently won the Canadian Half Marathon Championships in Calgary as well as 2014 champion Dylan Wykes. The latter has backed off somewhat on the training that saw him run the marathon in 2:10:47 and represent Canada at the 2012 Olympics. Nevertheless, he still finished 3rd in Calgary just thirty-two seconds behind Kangogo.

One surprise could very well be former 1,500m runner Geoff Martinson who recently ran a whopping 10000m personal best on the track –  28:48.33 in Portland. He was a surprising second at the Canadian Half Marathon Championships.

The women’s race features Dayna Pidhoresky who will join Toth in London for the World Championships following her stellar performance in Ottawa last month. Last year’s runner up Lyndsay Tessier is also entered.

For a complete Start List see: http://canadarunningseries.com/2017/06/scotiabank-vancouver-half-marathon-5k-elite-field/

For more information about the race:
http://canadarunningseries.com/scotiabank-vancouver-half-marathon/

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Running Room renews partnership with Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

By | Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

Canada Running Series is delighted to announce one of the world’s leading running retailers, Running Room, has renewed their multi-year partnership with the 2017 edition of the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, Half marathon & 5K, to be run on Sunday, October 22nd. Running Room will host the official marathon and half marathon Training Clinics and take on the Official Merchandise sponsor to complement their Official Sporting Goods Retailer category. In addition to financial support, this collaborative partnership will also include cross promotions over the next 5 months with New Balance, the new Athletic Footwear and apparel partner of the event.

“We’re thrilled to have Running Room return to Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon,” said Canada Running Series president, Alan Brookes. “They have been an outstanding partner since 2007 and have played a vital role in building the success of our IAAF Gold Label race. They also bring unparalleled product support and advice to our runners, and their passionate, unwavering support for running in Canada, especially through their training clinics, has been invaluable. We’re also very excited to see their line of STWM Official Merchandise and Training shirts this year, which will be made available online.”

According to John Stanton, Founder of the Running Room:

“The Running Room is proud to sponsor the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, a prestigious  IAAF Gold Label Marathon and one of only 5 in North America, the likes of Boston, Chicago and New York. The uniqueness of the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon is everyone from the recreational runner to the elite world class athlete enjoys the gold label delivery from start to finish of the various events under the leadership  of Alan Brookes and his team!”

Running Room’s internationally famous training clinics begin the week of June 19th at more than 40 store locations across Ontario, for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon and the Half marathon. 5K training begins the week of August 14th. Visit the Running Room website for details on times, dates and store locations.

About Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

An IAAF Gold Label race, the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon is Canada’s premier, big-city running event, the Athletics Canada National Marathon Championships, and the Grand Finale of the 7-race Canada Running Series. In 2016 it attracted 26,000 participants from 70 countries, raised $3.24 million for 182 charities through the Scotiabank Charity Challenge, and contributed an estimated $35 million to the local economy. The livestream broadcast was watched by more than 72,000 viewers from 129 countries. STWM.ca

About Running Room

Running Room is proudly a Canadian family-owned company. It originated in 1984 out of founder John Stanton’s wish to purchase quality running shoes from someone knowledgeable about the sport. New to the sport of running, John had a thirst for knowledge as well as a desire to buy the right product. This entrepreneurial retailer decided to fill a niche in the marketplace by opening a small one-room store in the renovated living room of an old house in Edmonton, hence the name, “Running Room.” The concept was highly successful, and the stores have since expanded to over 110 locations across Canada and the United States. Running Room is truly a store for runners by runners. All team members are runners whose philosophy is that if you’re out there running on the same roads as the customers, you can better relate to them. runningroom.com 

Media Contacts

Alan Brookes, Race Director, Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon
alan@canadarunningseries.com, 416-464-7437

Liz Caine, National Events, Running Room
lcaine@runningroom.com, tel:780.439.3099 ext 246

Race Day Tips for #ScotiaHalf

By | Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

Every year we’re joined by hundreds of new runners at both the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon and the 5k. For many people, it’s their first time participating in an event of this size. We’ve taken some tips from the seasoned runners out there and come up with the ABC’s of how to set yourself up for a great race – both before and after the event.

While this guide is primarily aimed at new runners, it’s always good to refresh your memory even if you’ve been racing for decades! Also be sure to check out our Race Etiquette Page.
Confirm your registration here.


Before the Race

A – Know where you need to be and when

This may seem obvious, but it’s so often overlooked. You can save yourself tonnes of stress on Race Day (and the days leading up to it) by knowing where to go and when. This includes knowing where to pick up your race package and bib number in the days leading up to the race, as well as how to get to the start line.

  • Expo – ALL participants must pick up their race package and bib number at Package Pickup before Race Day. Package Pickup is located at the Vancouver Convention Centre West (new for 2017; 1055 Canada Place, enter off Burrard St.) and is open on Friday, June 23 from 11am to 6:30pm, and Saturday, June 24 from 10am to 5pm. More details here.
  • 5k Start Line – the 5k begins on Stanley Park Drive, just west of the Fish House restaurant. Red corral begins at 9:15am, Blue corral at 9:20am, Green at 9:25am, and Purple at 9:30am (more on corrals further down the page). Make sure you leave plenty of time to get here, as there is NO PARKING near the start line – you will need to either take transit and walk, or park at the Rose Garden lot on the other side of Stanley Park and take our shuttle to the start (leave an extra 45 minutes for this). Details on this, plus maps, are here.
  • Half-Marathon Start Line – the Half begins on East Mall at UBC, near Thunderbird Arena. Race start is 7:30AM SHARP – leave extra time to get here due to road closures. Translink has increased service on the 99 B-Line and 25 bus routes for the morning, but if you are driving we recommend carpooling and parking at Thunderbird Parkade. Full details and maps are here.
    ***Important*** Make sure you leave plenty of time to find and use the washrooms before the run starts, although there are some washrooms available on course. Start Lines will CLOSE 10 minutes after the scheduled start times, meaning you will not be permitted to start after this point! Also note that there are construction closures on SW Marine Drive this year, so please use West 16th Ave, West 10th Ave, or Chancellor Blvd to get to UBC.***

B – Don’t do anything new! We mean it!

A common mistake is to try something new just before or on Race Day. This could be anything from wearing a new pair of shoes during the run to changing up your diet the day before. If you typically eat a simple pasta the night before your training runs, don’t try out that new Mexican Food Cart on Saturday night. If you don’t usually have coffee before your training runs, don’t go for a double espresso on Sunday morning. Stick with what works for you – from your meals to your running clothes to your morning routine.

C – Start in the right corral

When you pick up your bib number, you’ll notice a coloured corral box on it (Red, Yellow, Green, Blue, or Purple). This colour matches up with the corral you’ve been assigned to and there’ll be coloured corral flags at the start line to show you were to line up.
But what’s a corral? In order to give everyone their best experience on Race Day, we assign all participants into a corral based on their predicted finish time. This way, speedsters can start at the front of the pack while walkers start further back. Please be respectful of other runners and line up according to your expected finish time. Please also be mindful of other runners who may need to pass you on course – if you are running with children encourage them to stay close or hold their hand. Corral details for Half-Marathon and 5k.

BONUS – use our Gear Check to store a bag of warm, dry (and less-sweaty) clothes for after the race. Your $2 donation will go to our Featured Charities.


During the Race

A – Make sure your bib number is on your front and visible

We use a bib-tag timing system, which means your timing chip is embedded in your bib number. In order for it to work properly and have your time recorded:

  • Do not remove the “bibTag” or foam spacer from your bib.
  • Do not fold your bib or excessively bend or twist the “bibTag”.
  • Wear your bib on your chest/abdomen. Do not wear on your back, side, leg or arm.
  • Do not cover your bib with clothing – always make sure it is completely visible.
  • Make sure you cross over the timing mat at both the Start Line and the Finish Line.
    ***Start Lines for both the Half and 5k will CLOSE 10min AFTER THE SCHEDULED START TIME

B – Start slow and stay even

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of Race Day and start out too fast. Do the opposite – start a little slower than your normal pace and gradually pick up your pace over the first kilometre. After that, try to keep an even pace throughout the race and save your extra energy for the final push to the Finish Line!

C – Stay hydrated out there (and wear sunscreen!)

It can be pretty hot in June, so make sure to keep hydrated while on course. It’s a good idea to bring your own water, but we’ll also have plenty of aid stations on course, serving up both water and Gatorade. If you are using one of the aid stations:

  • When approaching a hydration station, move to the side of the road, grab your fluid/nutritional needs and keep moving. There will be multiple hydration tables so if the first table is busy KEEP MOVING.
  • Throw your used cup to the side of the road as close to the hydration station as possible, ideally in one of the marked bins. Drop your cup down by your waist so you don’t hit/splash another participant.
  • If you plan to stop at the aid station, move past the tables and pull off to the side of the road.
  • Say thank you to the volunteers!

After the Race

A – Keep moving

Collect your medal as you cross the Finish Line, then keep moving through the chute until you get to the Post-Race Recovery Area. Keep moving for at least 10 more minutes afterwards to gradually bring your heart rate down and help your legs flush out that lactic acid (this will prevent you from being stiff tomorrow).

B – Refuel and rehydrate

Right after the finish line we’ll have water and Gatorade for you to rehydrate with. Grab a cup and keep walking – there will be more in the Post-Race Recovery Area. A variety of snacks will be available in the Recovery Area, including bananas, bagels, Powerbar, cookies, raisins, juice, and yogurt. The carbs will help replenish your energy stores while a bit of protein will help rebuild your muscles. Make sure you eat something within 30 minutes of crossing the line.

C – Get warm and enjoy the Finish Area

After you’ve fueled up, stop by Gear Check to collect your spare clothes. Even on a sunny day, your core temperature will drop fast once you stop moving, especially when you’re still wearing sweaty clothes. Once you’ve done that, check out the live band, our Charity Village, and Awards Ceremony (10:30am).

If you’re looking for a place to meet your friend and family after the run, our five Charity Village tents will be labeled A, B, C, D, and E – pick a letter and meet in front of it. Full map of the Finish Area is here.

Congratulations! Now it’s time to start planning your next race – join us at the Under Armour Eastside 10k on September 17!

Wodak, Wendimu Win Toronto Waterfront 10K

By | Toronto Waterfront 10K | No Comments

TORONTO June 17. Canadian Olympian Natasha Wodak (33:52) and Kenyan-born Torontonian Daniel Wendimu (30:26) won today’s Toronto Waterfront 10K, presented by lululemon, in exciting races up front. Councillor Norm Kelly sent off a sold-out crowd of 7,100 from the 7:30 a.m. start on University Avenue next to City Hall under bright, sunny skies. The start temperature was a reasonable 21 degrees for June, with only a light breeze of 10k/hr from the east and humidity at 73%. The participants were drawn from 11 Canadian provinces and territories, 17 American states and 9 countries.

The men went through the first, downhill kilometre in 2:48 as Toronto Olympic Club’s Abrehem Wagaye moved to the front to push the pace ahead of a pack that included Wendimu, Canadian Olympians Eric Gillis and Reid Coolsaet, and Toronto’s Sami Jibril who ran so well as the top Canadian at the IAAF World Cross Country Championships in March. Wagaye steadily stretched his lead, to almost 100m at one point, passing 5k in 14:53. But gradually, as the sun and temperature rose, he began to fade and the chasers closed in to set up an exciting finish.

Photo Credit; Todd Fraser/Canada Running Series

Wendimu passed him just after 8k to race to victory. The courageous Wagaye (30:41) managed to hold off a charging Jibril (30:46) for second. Speed River TFCs Tristan Woodfine was 4th in 30:53, ahead of his Olympic club-mates Gillis and Coolsaet. With the IAAF World Championships marathon just 2 months away, Gillis stopped around 4km to protect “a slight twinge” in his quad. Coolsaet, coming back from a serious foot injury over the winter was pleased to be back racing again, finishing 8th in 31:51. “Racing a 10k when you’re not in shape is tough,” he joked. “It was a fantastic event. A great way to spark my training for a fall marathon.”

Vancouver’s Natasha Wodak led the women’s race from start to finish to build a commanding lead in the current Canada Running Series standings after her victory at the Race Roster Spring Run Off 8K in April in High Park. London, Ontario’s Leslie Sexton and Olympian Krista DuChene of Brantford tucked in behind for the first two kilometres before Canada’s 10,000m record holder dropped the hammer in a quick third kilometre. She then cruised along Toronto’s scenic waterfront, perhaps losing a little concentration mid-race. “At 8km I wrote off the course record (33:50),” said Wodak. “Then with about 50 metres to go I saw the clock and sprinted as hard as I could.” She crossed the line in 33:52, to take home C$2,800 first-prize, but missed the $500 record bonus by a scant 2 seconds!

Photo Credit: Todd Fraser/Canada Running Series

Leslie Sexton (34:49), who was also thrilled to be back racing after a lengthy injury-layoff, hung on for 2nd, with TOCs Dehininet Jara (34:51) a close 3rd. Brittany Moran (35:35) came home 4th, with DuChene (35:53) 5th and first women’s Master.  “It was great to be back racing,” said Sexton. “It’s so fun. I really missed this!” DuChene was also pleased with her effort as she starts her re-build for the fall season. “This was more about having a good time and getting back at it, rather than a fast time,” she said.

Indeed, for all the participants, today’s Toronto Waterfront 10K put the fun into running. “I’d like to think that today’s race was a key moment for road racing in Canada,” said Canada Running Series Race Director Alan Brookes. “I don’t think that’s an exaggeration. The activation that lululemon brought to the event was a game-changer. It really represented the new running movement, that is more diverse, more inclusive, more social, more fun, while still including our Olympians and the best of traditional road racing. From the all-day yoga to the donut wall and the nineamazing cheer sites on-course, lululemon brought the event alive and created an experience.” Parkdale Roadrunner’s Daniel Blether summed it up well, “Amazing event, awesome community vibes. #Waterfront10K is a gem.”

Photo Credit: Todd Fraser/Canada Running Series

To round out the new community running experience, New Leaf Foundation, a charity that offers yoga and mindfulness-based programs to support youth in marginalized communities, went home with a cheque for $16,500, raised by the 7,100 participants.

Full Results at http://canadarunningseries.com/toronto-10k/the-weekend/#results-and-photos 

Canada Running Series continues next weekend with the Scotiabank Vancouver Half marathon & 5K: http://scotiahalf.com

Meet your 2017 #ScotiaHalf Contenders

By | Elite Athletes, Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments
Kip Kangogo

Age: 37
Personal Best: 1:03:22

Kip Kangogo is a previous Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon winner, having won the event 5 times!  After immigrating from Kenya 14 years ago, he resides in Lethbridge, Alberta with his family.  Kip ran a 2:17:12 at the 2014  Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, to earn the opportunity to represent Canada at the 2015 Pan Am Games Marathon.  He is an accomplished runner in any event from the 5000m to the marathon, and has an exceptional knowledge of the #ScotiaHalf course , Kangogo will be a force to be reckoned with on June 25 as he hunts for his 6th win.

thomas toth
Thomas Toth

Age: 26
Personal best: 1:04:26

Thomas Toth had a breakthrough performance at the 2016 Aramco Houston Half-Marathon where he ran a blistering 1:04:26.   Following this, Toth went on to win the 2016 Canadian Half Marathon Championships in Calgary.  Since then, he’s set a solid mark in the marathon, debuting at 2:18:58 in the Hamburg Marathon. Beating the qualifying standard by 2 seconds, Toth has been selected to represent Canada in the marathon at the 2017 World Track and Field Championships in London, England this summer.

geoff martinson
Geoff Martinson

Age: 31
Personal best: 1:05:18

Geoff Martinson has specialized in shorter distances, with a semi final appearance in the 1500m at the 2011 World Track and Field Championships.  With many podium finishes at local road races, he was the former BC Champ in the 5k, and the winner of the 2015 Eastside 10k. With just a few early results at the half marathon distance, he’s one to watch for in the field.

dylan wykes
Dylan Wykes

Age: 34
Personal best: 1:02:14

Dylan Wykes is one of the most successful marathon runners in Canada. A member of the 2012 Canadian Olympic Team, he finished 20th in his Olympic debut at the London 2012 Games. He qualified for the Games by running 2:10:47 at the 2012 Rotterdam Marathon; a time that is the third fastest ever by a Canadian, behind only Jerome Drayton’s clocking of 2:10:09 in 1975 and Reid Coolsaet’s 2:10:28 clocking at the 2015 Berlin Marathon.  Wykes won the Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon in 2014 in 1:03:52, and will be contending for the top spot again this June.

dayna pidhoresky
Dayna Pidhoresky:

Age: 30
Personal best: 1:11:46

Dayna Pidhoresky has had a season like no other this year.  She has won every race she’s entered, and although she came in 7th behind an international field at the Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, she was the first Canadian and hit the mark that would qualify her for the 2017 World Track and Field Championships in London, England later this summer.  Having battled through a sacral stress fracture after running the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon in October, Pidhoresky has shown that all her hard work has paid off.  A previous winner of the Eastside 10k, Pidhoresky lives and trains in Vancouver with her husband/coach.  She has never run the Scotia Half, but living in the area will have helped in her preparation to shoot for the winning spot on June 25th.

sabrina wilkie
Sabrina Wilkie:

Age: 32
Personal best: 1:16:20

Sabrina Wilkie grew up in Langley, BC and now calls Vancouver home with her husband and their three-year old son. Self-coached since 2014, Wilkie has podiumed in many local road races and represented Canada at the 2014 NACAC Cross Country Championships.  Debuting in the Victoria Marathon last October, Wilkie won the women’s title in 2:45:54.  Outside of running and family, Wilkie is at the University of British Columbia completing her Masters of Physical Therapy.

lyndsay tessier
Lyndsay Tessier:

Age: 39
Personal best: 1:16:12

Lyndsay Tessier is a competitive runner from Toronto, Ontario who placed second at the 2016 Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon.  Tessier has competed in many road running races all across Canada and recently won the Mississauga Half Marathon on May 7 in 1:16:12.  Being familiar with the Scotia Half course, Lyndsay will be ready to better her last years placing, and will be in contention for a spot at the top of the podium.

The full Elite List for this year’s event can be found here.

Want to join these contenders on June 25? Head on over to the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon to see if there’s still space left!

Perfecting the taper

By | Scotiabank Vancouver Half, Training Tips | No Comments

 

Tapering can be the hardest part of a training block, but also the most important.  It’s a time where runners start to go a little stir crazy.  After months of training and maintaining a routine of running most days of the week, it’s always strange to cut mileage back.  Feelings of unpreparedness, sluggishness, and worry grip even the most confident runners.

Easing off of running volume, but not necessarily intensity, allows the body to fully recover from the training build.  With rested muscles that are fully loaded with energy, race pace will feel more manageable than ever.  Here are some tips to nail your taper without going too crazy from the lack of running!

Taper duration:

Taper phases can last anywhere from seven to 14 days depending on the race distance and the runner’s experience.  Make sure to stick to your taper plan even if you become restless.  It’s common for beginners to take two weeks to taper, while more experienced distance runners tend to opt for a one-week taper.

Training:

In the final weeks of a build, it’s unlikely you’ll gain a lot of extra fitness.  Instead of continuing to push your body right up to race day, ease off and allow it to bask in the efforts you’ve put forth in the months leading up to the race.  Cutting back your mileage is crucial to a successful taper, but it doesn’t mean that the intensity needs to decrease.  Many runners will reduce their total mileage by at least 50%, but still include a couple quality workouts to keep the legs feeling peppy and their mind at ease.  Reducing both running quantity and quality results in an overactive mind that convinces us that all our training has vanished and we’re unprepared.  So, keep the mileage low but maintain a small amount of intensity to keep the body sharp.

Distraction:

Less training, means more spare time.  Instead of going stir crazy, use this time to catch up on neglected tasks, or turn your training focus to recovery.  Go for a massage; stretch and roll out any kinks; go for short walks to get some fresh air; or take the time to visit with the friends and family that have supported you along the way.  Create race day plans, organize your race kit, collect your bib, set goals and visualize your race day success. This extra time should be filled with activities that celebrate YOU and get you into the best physical and mental state possible.

Nutrition:

Eating right and fuelling your resting muscles before a race is key.  Lower mileage doesn’t mean you have to slash your calories significantly.  With that, you don’t need to consume quite as much as you would during high training weeks. The taper is a time to replenish your stores and start storing glycogen for race day.  Fill your body with some extra complex carbohydrates in the couple of weeks before the race.  A gradual increase in carbohydrate is far more effective than wolfing down plates of pasta the night before the race which can result in feeling heavy or bloated come race morning.  As long as you’re sensible in your food intake and still eating healthy fats, protein and complex carbs, weight gain is unlikely.  Instead your body will thank you for the fuel and will be burned off come race day!

Sleep:

Pent up energy is common during a taper. This can sometimes make it difficult to get a good nights sleep.  Try to maintain a consistent schedule and hit the hay around the same time each night.  Catch up on your favourite TV shows, or grab a good book to rest your body and indulge in some frivolous entertainment.  Keep in mind that two nights before the race is the most important night for a restful sleep.  Most races occur on a Sunday, so Friday night is the important one.  It’s normal to have a short sleep the night before a race.  Many high level athletes you talk to will admit to barely sleeping the night before big events.  There’s too much excitement and anticipation the night before to truly rest.

Trust the taper!

It’s easy to feel “phantom pains” or have doubts sneak into your mind in the days before the race.  Try to ignore these thoughts and feelings, and stick to your plan.  Keep to your usual schedule, don’t try anything new leading up to the race, and believe that you’ve prepared yourself as best as you can.  Then, go out and have a killer race day!  That’s the fun part.

Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k – Elite Field

By | Elite Athletes, Scotiabank Vancouver Half | No Comments

 

Scotia HalfIntroducing our Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k Elite Field.

Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon Male Elite Athletes  
  Bib # Last Name First Name City Prov.
1 Kangogo Kip Lethbridge AB
2 Toth Thomas Plaistow NH
3 Wykes Dylan Vancouver BC
4 Martinson Geoffrey Vancouver BC
5 Woodfine Tristan Guelph ON
6 Kimosop Willy Lethbridge AB
7 Kasia Dancan Toronto ON
11 Bascal Shoayb Victoria BC
12 Gomez Inaki Vancouver BC
13 Browne Nicholas Vancouver BC
14 Blazey Paul Norwich UK
15 Mulverhill Chris Vancouver BC
16 Dunfee Evan Richmond BC
17 Nicholson Drew Surrey BC
21 Ziak Jeremiah Vancouver BC
22 McMillan Craig North Vancouver BC
23 Hatachi Tatsuya Coquitlam BC
24 Fieldwalker Matt Vancouver BC
25 Newby James Squamish BC
26 Portman Bryan Nanaimo BC
Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon Female Elite Athletes  
  Bib # Last Name First Name City Prov.
F2 Pidhoresky Dayna Vancouver BC
F4 Tessier Lyndsay Toronto ON
F5 Wilkie Sabrina Vancouver BC
F6 Olsen Courtney Bellingham WA
F7 Coll Neasa Vancouver BC
F11 Moroz Jen Vancouver BC
F13 Lewis-Schneider Meg Vancouver BC
F14 Smart Kristin Cobble Hill BC
F15 Pepin Cheryl North Vancouver BC
F16 Dale Shannon North Vancouver BC
F17 Longridge Corri Vancouver BC
F18 Moore Katherine Vancouver BC
F22 Kassel Melanie Chilliwack BC
F23 Montgomery Darcie North Vancouver BC
Scotiabank Vancouver 5km Elite Athletes    
  Bib # Last Name First Name City Prov.
5002 Wilkie Mark Vancouver BC
5003 Watkins Catherine Vancouver BC
5004 Gustafson Kate Vancouver BC