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recovery properly after a race

How to recover properly after a race

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As soon as you step over the finish line, it’s important to think about recovering properly after a race.  It’s usually overlooked, but is a crucial component of one’s training program.  Accomplishing any race distance is certainly something that should be celebrated with post-race festivities, and a little rest and relaxation.  But what happens after that?  It’s easy to get through the pre-race taper, hit the ground running on race day, and bask in your success. But what’s the best way to get back into running?  How long does recovery take?  What’s the best way to recover?

Immediately after:

As soon as you cross the finish line don’t stop moving.  Keep walking towards your medal, post-race food, and to see any friends and family that have come to support you.  Working hard during a race causes your heart to pump blood and oxygen rapidly through your body, and will continue to do so even after you cross the line.  By walking around for a good 15-20 minutes afterwards will help to avoid any blood from pooling in your extremities if you were to stop abruptly.  Moving will help to flush out the metabolic waste that’s accumulated in your muscles from the race, and will aid in active recovery.  Continue to move for the rets of the day too – nothing crazy, but after you’ve had a nap opt to go for a short walk in the evening to keep your muscles from tightening up.

Within one to two hours

Get some fluids and food in you as soon as you can.  Burning through your energy stores, and sweating throughout a race can leave you depleted.  Races will have some post-race food that will be great to bridge the gap between the end of the race and your next meal.  Try to get a good amount of carbohydrates and protein to feed your exhausted muscles.  It’s important to rehydrate with 16-20 oz of water for every pound of body weight you’ve lost during the race.  Add in electrolytes, or grab a sports drink to replenish electrolytes lost through sweating.  The amount you have to drink to rehydrate will depend on your sweat rate, the heat/humidity of the day, and how much you hydrated throughout the race.  Keeping an eye on the colour of your urine is a good indicator: light yellow/lemonade is the colour to strive for.  Try to avoid alcohol immediately after the race, or at least until you’ve had some water/electrolytes.  Having depleted your body’s stores, the effects of the alcohol are much greater post-race and can impede your recovery.

24 hours after:

Getting a good night’s sleep after a big race is key.  It can be difficult falling asleep after big efforts due to achy and restless legs.  Avoid taking anti-inflammatories – your body elicits an inflammatory response as part of it’s healing process.  The sore muscles may suck initially, but it’s all part of the process.  If you’re having a tough time sleeping, look into taking melatonin. It is a natural substance created in our pineal gland that helps to regulate our sleep-wake cycle.

The day after a race, if your muscles are still sore and achy, take an ice bath.  This will help speed up the recovery process by assisting the body in reducing the inflammation in the tissues.  Use the day after a race to debrief about the race, go for a walk, and just relax.  The down time after a race is just as important as the hard work before a race.

The week after the race:

Going back into training doesn’t need to be done right away.  A lot of people will take a few days off, and go for walks/light cross training to keep their body moving and loose.  The rule of thumb is in the first couple weeks after a race, follow the structure of the taper week, but in reverse.  It’s a great guideline for easing back into intensity without overdoing it.  Avoid too much intensity until about 10-14 days after the race to allow your muscles to fully recover before getting back into the swing of things.  Also, don’t forget the importance of rolling and stretching.  Many runners will book a massage or physio appointment for the week after a race to help flush their legs out.  Both these options help your recovery by increasing blood flow to your recovering muscles.

Keep in mind that these guidelines are just suggestions.  Everyone takes different times to heal and recover.  Listen to your body to figure out the best approach for your return to training.

Workouts to get you out of a training rut

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We all have time where the last thing we want to do is run or work out.  These “slumps” are normal, and either come about due to boredom or fatigue.  The repetition of tempos, long runs, and hill repeats can be enough to make you dread having to do another workout. If you’re stuck in a training rut, it might be time to try something new to reignite the fire.  Switching up workout types, or who you’re running with, can be enough to motivate you again. Here are some ways to mix up the monotony of running:

Find a group

If you’re used to doing every workout or easy run on your own, it might be time to hop into a group environment.  Casual chatter and comraderie can help ease the pain of a workout, or at least create enough distraction that the miles fly by.  Most cities have a running group of some kind whether it’s a local running crew or a group out of a running store.  Do a little bit of research and find one that’s convenient and works with your schedule.

Group fartlek

We’ve all heard of the fartlek workout, which is essentially just speed play.  Paces and interval duration are varied to keep the workout fun.  Another way of doing this workout is with a group of at least 5 people.  In a single file line, the runner at the front sets the pace.  Then, the runner at the end of the line must surge to the front of the pack to settle in as the new leader at their desired pace.  The person at the rear can choose to surge whenever they choose which keeps the rest of the group on their toes.  It’s a great way to challenge each other and do a speedy workout without too much thought.

Be a broken record

Repeats are a simple yet effective workout for any distance.  The intensity and distance of the interval will determine the recovery.  Long intervals or short intense bursts will require longer rest periods than moderate intensity repeats.  The rest period should be longer enough that your heart rate settles and you’re able to talk.  Aim to keep the intervals consistent; blowing it out of the water on the first rep will leave you gassed for the rest of the workout and won’t provide the most beneficial training effects.

Go up and down a ladder

Pyramid or ladder workouts are a fun mix up to interval training.  Choose to do the intervals by distance or by duration.  For example, a ladder workout on the track could look something like: 200m-400m-600m-800m-1000m-1000m-800m-600m-400m-200m.  For recovery, match the hard interval distance and try to keep the paces consistent.  Much like coming down a hill, climbing down the ladder will feel easier with decreasing interval distances!  These workouts can be as long or as short as you wish, and can be done based on time so you don’t have to find a track.

Race!

A great way to get back into shape, or fuel the fire is to actually step onto the starting line again.  Use the pre-race nerves and adrenaline to pump you up to run.  The crowds of people will be great to push you, plus having a closed course with no traffic is ideal!  Check out your local running scene for upcoming races and sign up.  It could be enough to get booted out of a training rut.

Rest

If nothing seems to be working, it might be that you just need a couple days off of running.  Many people forget the importance of rest and recovery.  It’s just as important as running workouts!  Take a few days to sleep in, try a new activity, catch up on some reading, or try a new recipe.  Stepping away from a regimented training schedule for a short time won’t decrease your overall fitness.  It could be actually be exactly what you need to get to the next level of fitness and boost your training.

benefits of track work

The benefits of hitting the track

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The benefits of track work when training for anything longer than 5k aren’t often discussed during a race build. Track workouts have their time and place for any race distance.  While crucial for typical track events of 5000m and under, they also provide many benefits for any distance up to the marathon.  Even ultra marathoners do track workouts sometimes!  It can feel intimidating heading to the perfectly marked 400m oval. The fear of the workout’s intensity, not knowing how to pace, or pressure to perform an a perfectly flat and manicured surface can steer runners away.  Try to ignore those barriers and remember the benefits a track workout will provide.

Learn to pace

On the track, the terrain is consistent and is perfectly flat.  These characteristics help runners learn how to properly pace themselves and understand what difference paces feel like. When running on the track, you must mentally push yourself to keep on pace. This helps build mental strength as well as physical strength, which is the opposite of treadmill running that forcefully keeps you moving at the same speed.  Understand that not every interval needs to be an all-out effort.  Being able to keep tabs on the pace by checking splits every half-lap (200m) or full lap (400m), will provide timely feedback so you know how and when to adjust your pace.

Improved running economy/efficiency

Running easy is exactly what it sounds like: easy.  It builds a tolerance to pavement pounding and slowly creates an aerobic base, but it also only teaches how to run at a leisurely pace.  Track workouts encourage a faster turnover. Therefore, it teaches your body how to run fast by adapting neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and respiratory systems.  Faster turnover helps recruit and stimulate fast-twitch muscle fibers.  The amount in which it helps to make you run faster is very individual, but it will certainly help you from getting slower!  By building an aerobic foundation, it enhances the amount of oxygen that is consumed at a given pace. Meaning you’re able to hold a higher intensity for an extended duration before running out of steam.

Mental toughness

The thought of running around in 400m ovals isn’t exactly appealing. The monotony of the unchanging terrain and elevation can make it hard to remain motivated throughout a workout.  However, that’s exactly what makes the track great.  It requires mental toughness to remain on task throughout the workout especially with the workout’s heightened intensity. Seemingly unnecessary to do 400m repeats when training for a half or full marathon, it’s actually incredibly helpful.  When busting out shorter and faster intervals, it forces your legs to get out of an easy run shuffle and into a more powerful stride. By pushing a pace that can only be held for a short period of time, it makes the speed of threshold/tempo runs feel much more manageable.

So when training for your next goal race, be sure to include some speedy track sessions into your build.  Ideally grab a group of friends to accompany you and push the pace.  Do a full warmup to fully prepare your muscles for the intensity of the workout and don’t forget to have fun!

Dressing for the heat

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In the middle of summer, the heat has set in and most runner’s have become slightly more acclimatized to the weather.  However, if you typically run in the early morning/evenings when the temperature is lower, and you’re faced with an afternoon run, it can still be a shock to the system.  Much like winter running, what you wear can help you survive the run no matter what the conditions are.  Keeping sun safety, hydration, and thermoregulation in mind, these are some of the best ways to beat the heat.

Wear technical fabrics
We’ve all heard that cotton is the enemy, and it certainly is when it comes to running in the heat.  Unlike moisture-wicking technical fabrics, cotton absorbs sweat which weighs the clothing down and puts you at risk of chafing.  Technical fabrics are breathable and pull moisture away from the body to keep you cool through evaporation of sweat.

Keep it loose and light
Looser fitting shirts help to keep you cool by offering more ventilation as the air can move through the clothing unlike tighter fitting clothing which can retain body heat.  Choose light colours as they reflect the sunlight, whereas black/dark colour absorb the sun’s heat.  This will put you at risk of overheating.

Protect your head
Your body releases a lot of it’s heat through your head, so it’s important to wear a technical fabric hat or visor.  The benefit of a cap is that it protects your scalp from getting burnt, and can be stuffed with ice or soaked with cold water to cool you down even further.  Visors help shield your face and eyes from harmful UV rays, but do leave your head exposed to the sun.

Keep your eyes relaxed
It’s easy to forget how much energy squinting takes out of you while on the run.  It causes unnecessary  energy expenditure and can cause headaches or migraines.  Grab a pair of UVA & UVB protected sunglasses to keep your eyes relaxed and protected from the sun’s harmful rays.

Slather on the sunscreen
Skin is the body’s largest organ, so it’s important to protect it.  Make sure to apply sunscreen wherever there may be skin exposure; if you plan on delayering throughout the run, don’t forget those areas too!  Opt for at least SPF 30 and waterproof so that it stays on as you sweat on the run.

Accessorize with hydration
Running in the heat causes your body to sweat more and lose water and electrolytes at an alarming rate.  If not replaced in a timely manner, it puts you at heat of dehydration and susceptible to heat-related illnesses.  Use either a hand-held bottle, a fuel belt, or a hydration pack for easy access to fluids.  If you aren’t a fan of carrying something while you run, plan a route that passes by water fountains or convenience stores where you can pop in to grab a sports drink if necessary.

Running cool in hot weather

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When summer hits, it’s important to take the heat into consideration when you’re planning your weekly runs/workouts.  Fortunately the days are long so there are lots of options for putting the work in without suffering from the summer sun.  Here are a few things to consider before heading out for your run:

Be timely:

The coolest temperatures are in the morning and evening when the sun isn’t high in the sky.  The UV ray intensity is lower, and if you go in the morning there’s usually less people to dodge and it’ll boost your energy for the day!  Depending on whether you’re an early bird or a night owl, find a time that works best for you.

Keep hydrated:

No matter what time of day you run at, be sure to hydrate before, during and after your run.  Warmer temperatures require you to up your overall fluid intakes to keep your perspiration systems and temperature regulation in top form.  Depending on your individual sweat rate, and how salty your sweat is will change what your replenishing needs are.  Water may not be enough, so consider a sports drink or electrolyte supplement too.  If you’re heading out for a long run, plan your route so there are water fountains or convenience stores where you quench your thirst throughout the run.

Protect your skin:

Harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays can cause skin damage, and can potentially lead to skin cancer especially in prolonged sun exposure.  Slather on the sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher with both UVA and UBV protection to prevent sun burns, protect your skin, and keep your skin/body temperature lower.  Your skin will thank you now and in the future!

Run cool:

Everyone has a go-to running route depending on their preference of terrain and scenery.  If possible, when the weather heats up choose a loop that either runs past water, or through the forest.  Bodies of water such as rivers, lakes and oceans tend to have breezier conditions that provide a slightly cooler environment.  Sticking to the trails will not only provide extra shade from the tree cover, but the softer surface won’t retain or radiate heat as much as asphalt does.

Dress appropriately:

Running is a perfect time to break out the bright and light colours that most people’s everyday neutral wardrobes don’t have.  Wearing dark colours or cottons is a sure-fire way to put yourself at risk of overheating; the dark colour absorb/attract the heat and cotton doesn’t have the best breathability.  Instead, opt for light-coloured and loose fitting attire that reflects the sun’s rays away and allows the breeze to get through.  Most athletic wear is now made of moisture-wicking synthetic fabric which helps to cool the body down, rather than the original cotton-tees that soak moisture up instead of wicking it away.

Always accessorize:

When fighting the heat don’t forget the value of a hat and sunglasses.  Choose a hat with breathable mesh so that the heat loss from your head isn’t trapped in the cap, and protects your scalp from the sun’s rays.  When grabbing sunglasses, don’t choose a trendy pair that don’t have proper UV protection.  Make sure that the lens have both UVA and UVB protection to shield your eyes from harmful light.

Adjust expectations:

Before you acclimatize to the heat, adjust your training and paces to accommodate for the increased energy expenditure that running in the heat brings.  It takes time to adjust to hot weather, so give yourself a couple of weeks to let you body adapt to the heat, especially if it hasn’t been given the gradual seasonal progression.  Begin by doing easy runs a few times a week, then slowly build in workouts and remember to slow the pace down and run by feel.  If you’re consistently running a minute slower per mile than normal but the effort is still there, understand that as long as the effort is there, the results will come!

The do’s and don’ts of training while injured

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Runner’s are notorious for training through injury.  No matter how much this may be revered, doing this can do more damage than good.  The “no pain, no gain” mentality is a mindset many athlete’s have, but is a detrimental one.  There are times that training through discomfort is okay, like dealing with delayed onset muscle soreness from a previous workout. However, when the discomfort is actually painful, it’s worth second guessing your decision to train.  Many injuries start with a little niggle that gets pushed aside and trained through.  By not giving it a chance to heal, that niggle can escalate into pain, and then into a full-blown injury.

This is where listening to your body, and seeking professional helps comes in.  Getting injured doesn’t mean you’re sidelined from everything as there are many other cross-training activities that can help to maintain fitness.  Learning to train around an injury will not only help you to recover faster, it’ll keep your mind at ease.

See a doctor or sport-related practitioner to diagnose the problem, and use your own common sense and grit to keep training sensibly.  These are some of the most common mistakes of training with an injury, and how to avoid it from happening to you:

MISTAKE: “No pain, no gain.”
FIX: Listen to your body.

Our bodies are incredibly resilient and are able to downplay a lot of things.  We have nerve endings in our body that sense pain called nociceptors.  Depending on the area of the body that’s affected, pain that may feel intense in one area, may feel minimal somewhere else.  However, when any kind of pain is felt, it usually hurts for a reason and is a good indication that something is wrong.  The “no pain, no gain” mentality is a recipe for disaster.  When people push through these signals and continue doing the activity that causes pain, it’s not surprising that damage occurs.
So instead of trying to act like a hero, take time off from the painful activity.  This will allow any damage to remain minimal and heal more efficiently.  If the pain is significant or doesn’t improve after a few days of rest, consult a doctor or physiotherapist to assess the injury and determine the root cause.

MISTAKE: Consulting Dr. Google.
FIX: Consult a human professional.

Having the world’s knowledge at our fingertips can be a dangerous resource when trying to diagnose an injury.  What may be the signs and symptoms of a minor muscle strain, could look like the tell-tale signs of some rare incurable disease.  Unless you personally have a background in human anatomy and sports injuries, it’s best to leave the diagnosing up to the professionals.

Seek out a doctor, physiotherapist, chiropractor, or RMT who has experience with athletes and will understand your desire to get back to training as soon as possible.  Not only will they help to identify the problem, they’ll give a reasonable timeline, and be more understanding in their return to health plan.  Incorporating cross-training alternatives and maintenance exercises to prevent the injury from happening again, sport-specific practitioners will have you back in the game in a timely fashion.

MISTAKE: Thinking absolute rest is the answer.
FIX: Cross-train.

It’s normal to think that resting an injury is going to help it heal faster.  The issue is when people rest completely, and cease any and all activity.  Unless you’ve been told by a practitioner to do nothing, there will be other activities that won’t cause any pain or do further damage. Exercise, in any shape or form, helps your body recover.  People’s cardiovascular health, metabolism and immune system are all influenced by exercise in a positive way.
So instead of becoming a couch potato when you’re injured, try different cross-training activities and use your extra time to do tedious physio exercises that will stave off any other injuries.  Modify workouts but adjusting the intensity, only working non-injured muscles, and avoid anything that causes pain.  You’ll be able to maintain fitness, gain overall strength, and keep sane during a time where you’re unable to run.

MISTAKE: Starting where you left off.
FIX: Ease back into it.

Being injured is bad enough, but it’s even harder when you’re allowed to run again but have restrictions on what you can do.  Trying to jump right back into training at the level you were at pre-injury, can set you back again.  While that fitness level might be the most fresh in your mind, it doesn’t mean your body is ready to do it.  Start back slowly and conservatively.  Avoid speedwork and hills for the first stage of recovery; don’t run on back-to-back days until you can run and have no pain before, during, or after; and increase your mileage by 10% per week.  Keeping these guidelines in mind will lessen the chance of reinjury.

Don’t give up! An injury is annoying and frustrating to deal with, but it doesn’t mean you’ll never be able to run again.  Seek out help, be patient, and rekindle your love for other activities; it’ll make the recovery time go by much faster!

#UAeastside10k Training Program

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With the Under Armour Eastside 10k fast approaching, our friends at MapMyRun have put together a well-structured training plan to set you up for success. There are four parts to the program: Strength; Movement and Mobility; Running and Endurance; and Recovery. Here’s how it works:

Strength
The Strength program is designed to meet the demands of a runner looking for a more competitive edge. It isn’t designed to build muscle, but rather enhance your stability and mobility to runstronger.

Movement & Mobility
This routine will prepare your body for running by increasing mobility at the ankles, hips and T-spine. It will also activate your body for the twice weekly Strength sessions.

The Running & Endurance program is built for beginner- and intermediate-level runners. You will be introduced to tempo running, fast hill repeats and long slow runs, and you’ll develop the discipline for recovery runs.

Recovery
This routine is based on Under Armour’s belief that today’s recovery is tomorrow’s training. It is essential to attempt to restore movement quality after a run and the program is designed to hit the areas of the body that need the most attention.

All you need is eight weeks, a foam roller, and a firm commitment to get fast, strong and ready for race day. Are you ready? Read on for more details and download the official Under Armour 10k training plan here!

Get fast, strong and ready to toe the line come Race Day!

Whether you’re running your first 10K or your 100th, having a well-structured prepared training plan is your best bet to set you up for a successful race day. From mobility and endurance to strength and recovery, this plan provides everything you need to have your best race yet—and maybe even snag yourself a PR along the way.

Are you ready?

 

THIS EIGHT-WEEK PROGRAM WILL HELP YOU BECOME A BETTER RUNNER WITH MOBILITY, ENDURANCE STRENGTH, AND RECOVERY TRAINING.

 

Recovery Routine

Recovery Grid

Adjusting your race goals when things get hot

By | Racing Strategy, Training Tips | No Comments

Racing in the heat can be tough: you sweat more; your body temperature is higher; and your perceived exertion goes up for paces that are usually manageable.  The heat throw a wrench into your plans, both mentally and physically, especially if all of your training has done in cooler weather.  Most runners have race day plans for their pacing, various race strategies, and nutrition, but it’s rare that people plan for significant weather changes.  While you won’t be able to change the weather, there are ways to adjust to prepare yourself in a short amount of time:

If you’re travelling to run in a hot race, try to arrive to your destination as soon as you can.  Taking a few days to acclimate will make a big difference come race day.  The body needs time to adjust to the heat, especially if you’re coming from a cooler climate.

When temperatures go above 20C , the negative effects of heat start to amplify, so the least amount of exposure to the heat and sun possible one race day is ideal.  Cut your warmup short and do just enough to get your muscles moving and ready to ease into race pace. If you there’s an opportunity to keep cool in the shade, take it.  Also, think about bringing a towel to soak in cool water or ice, to place on your neck/hands in an effort to keep your core temperature down.  You’ll feel more comfortable at a cooler temperature and ready to run fast as a result.

Once the gun goes off, try to start at a slower pace and adjust your goals.  The heat can negatively affect the race, but it won’t necessarily sabotage it entirely. If you’re sensible in your approach, a fast time is possible, it just might not be a personal best.  By going out a little bit slower than initially intended will keep you in check, and increase the likelihood of finishing the race strong.

Throughout the race understand that your fueling strategies may have to change.  Your body will be working hard to regulate your temperature, so the fuel that you’re used to may not sit well in your gut.  However, drinking a fuelling is key so do your best to consume early and often.  Taking in nutrition while you’re feeling good in the first half of the race, will help you in the latter part of the run if things start to go sideways.  Taking even just a sip or two or water/sports drink at every station will help to get you to the finish line.

Adjusting your race plans and goals when the heat sets in can be enough to salvage a race.  Throughout training be sure to plan for any and every kind of mishap, it can make a difference when it really matters!

Perfecting the taper

By | Scotiabank Vancouver Half, Training Tips | No Comments

 

Tapering can be the hardest part of a training block, but also the most important.  It’s a time where runners start to go a little stir crazy.  After months of training and maintaining a routine of running most days of the week, it’s always strange to cut mileage back.  Feelings of unpreparedness, sluggishness, and worry grip even the most confident runners.

Easing off of running volume, but not necessarily intensity, allows the body to fully recover from the training build.  With rested muscles that are fully loaded with energy, race pace will feel more manageable than ever.  Here are some tips to nail your taper without going too crazy from the lack of running!

Taper duration:

Taper phases can last anywhere from seven to 14 days depending on the race distance and the runner’s experience.  Make sure to stick to your taper plan even if you become restless.  It’s common for beginners to take two weeks to taper, while more experienced distance runners tend to opt for a one-week taper.

Training:

In the final weeks of a build, it’s unlikely you’ll gain a lot of extra fitness.  Instead of continuing to push your body right up to race day, ease off and allow it to bask in the efforts you’ve put forth in the months leading up to the race.  Cutting back your mileage is crucial to a successful taper, but it doesn’t mean that the intensity needs to decrease.  Many runners will reduce their total mileage by at least 50%, but still include a couple quality workouts to keep the legs feeling peppy and their mind at ease.  Reducing both running quantity and quality results in an overactive mind that convinces us that all our training has vanished and we’re unprepared.  So, keep the mileage low but maintain a small amount of intensity to keep the body sharp.

Distraction:

Less training, means more spare time.  Instead of going stir crazy, use this time to catch up on neglected tasks, or turn your training focus to recovery.  Go for a massage; stretch and roll out any kinks; go for short walks to get some fresh air; or take the time to visit with the friends and family that have supported you along the way.  Create race day plans, organize your race kit, collect your bib, set goals and visualize your race day success. This extra time should be filled with activities that celebrate YOU and get you into the best physical and mental state possible.

Nutrition:

Eating right and fuelling your resting muscles before a race is key.  Lower mileage doesn’t mean you have to slash your calories significantly.  With that, you don’t need to consume quite as much as you would during high training weeks. The taper is a time to replenish your stores and start storing glycogen for race day.  Fill your body with some extra complex carbohydrates in the couple of weeks before the race.  A gradual increase in carbohydrate is far more effective than wolfing down plates of pasta the night before the race which can result in feeling heavy or bloated come race morning.  As long as you’re sensible in your food intake and still eating healthy fats, protein and complex carbs, weight gain is unlikely.  Instead your body will thank you for the fuel and will be burned off come race day!

Sleep:

Pent up energy is common during a taper. This can sometimes make it difficult to get a good nights sleep.  Try to maintain a consistent schedule and hit the hay around the same time each night.  Catch up on your favourite TV shows, or grab a good book to rest your body and indulge in some frivolous entertainment.  Keep in mind that two nights before the race is the most important night for a restful sleep.  Most races occur on a Sunday, so Friday night is the important one.  It’s normal to have a short sleep the night before a race.  Many high level athletes you talk to will admit to barely sleeping the night before big events.  There’s too much excitement and anticipation the night before to truly rest.

Trust the taper!

It’s easy to feel “phantom pains” or have doubts sneak into your mind in the days before the race.  Try to ignore these thoughts and feelings, and stick to your plan.  Keep to your usual schedule, don’t try anything new leading up to the race, and believe that you’ve prepared yourself as best as you can.  Then, go out and have a killer race day!  That’s the fun part.

Connected Fitness

5 ways Connected Fitness apps and products can elevate your training.

By | Eastside 10k, Training Tips | No Comments

Today’s running competition is fierce and becoming your best takes more than just training. In the past, knowing when to train and how hard to train was simply based on how you felt. Now, through connected fitness apps and products, technology can test your body and tell you when and how to train, how to set goals and track against them. You no longer have to write down how you felt after a long run, or time yourself or even track your distance – connected fitness products do this for you allowing you to focus on one thing, your run. Below are five ways that connected fitness can elevate your training:

  1. Set Goals and Smash Them

Connected fitness apps such as MapMyRun make it easy for you to set goals, track them, beat them, and set new ones. You can track time, cadence, duration, distance and splits, making it super easy for you to see how you are tracking against your goals.

  1. Know when you’re ready to push the limits

The new Under Armour Record-Equipped shoes will tell you whether or not today is the day to push your limits. Each Record-Equipped shoe has a chip that not only tracks your run, but analyzes the explosive power in your jump to tell you whether or not your body is ready to train. To perform the jump test, simply jump around before your run. After setting a baseline, your jump score will measure muscle fatigue and recovery rate to suggest how intensely to run. To learn more about the shoes and the jump test, click here.

  1. Track your route

No more Google maps, no more getting lost. Apps like MapMyRun, make it easy for you to track your route and your time. If you have smart running shoes, simply go out for a run and the GPS tracker in the shoes will track your route, time, stride length, and more. Even if you’ve left your phone at home, Under Armour Record-Equipped shoes will track and store your run data for up to five runs before needing to be synced.

  1. Stay connected with some friendly competition

There’s no better way to push yourself than a little healthy competition. If you can’t get out and run with your friends or crew don’t worry, connected fitness allows you to have an online community where you can share your routes and results.

  1. When to get new shoes

Running in a pair of worn down sneakers is a recipe for an injury, and knowing when your favourite pair has run its course and are ready to retire is tricky. Under Armour Record-Equipped shoes keep track of how far you have run and send you a notification once your shoes have reached the 650 km mark – that’s approximately 15 marathons. After 650 km, it’s time to ditch the shoes and buy a new pair.

UA Record Equipped