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Kim Doerksen

The Gift of Giving – Elite Edition

By | Elite Athletes | No Comments

With the holidays just around the corner, we asked some of the elites that have graced us with their presence on the start line about some of their favourite holiday gift, traditions, and ideas for other runners.  We heard from Trevor Hofbauer, Catherine Watkins, Dylan Wykes, Leslie Sexton, and Kate Gustafson.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

Trevor Hofbauer:  The best Christmas gift I ever received was a Nintendo 64. The N64 is a classic and it logged hundreds of gaming hours.  The best running related gift I ever received was a Petzl headlamp. It has 3 settings at 50-lumens, 100, and 150. It gets put to use frequently throughout the winter and periodically in the summer during early morning runs and around the campfire.

Kate Gustafson: Composite hockey stick. As a teenager, this was so epic!

Catherine Watkins: The best gifts for me are experience gifts with a destination or an activity (Escape the Room or a Broadway Show for example).  I love the long lasting memories these kind of gifts leave me with.

Dylan Wykes: Goalie pads. When I was 13.

Leslie Sexton: I got a Garmin Forerunner 205 about ten years ago. It was big and bulky and took a while to connect with satellites, but it told me how far I ran and how fast, so I loved it. I upgraded to a 220 a few years ago.

What the best gift for a runner?

Trevor:  The best gift is definitely a headlamp. It’s a multipurpose gift that can be used all year round.

Kate: A gift certificate to a local spa (with a massage included), hands down.  This is such a treat.

Catherine:   Gift certificates for race entries, babysitting services to look after their children while they race/train, homemade cookies (runners always love a good cookie), or a great running watch.

Dylan: Gloves, headlamp, socks, wind protective undies (if you live east of the Rockies…). All the stuff you never think of, but that is essential, and can’t hurt to have a lot of, especially for winter running.  A good running book is great at Christmas too; Once a Runner is the classic.

Leslie: Winter running socks! It may not sound very exciting but a good pair of merino wool socks can cost $20 so it is something a lot of people wouldn’t buy for themselves, making it a practical and thoughtful gift for a runner training through the winter. For guys, a pair of winter running boxers with a windproof material in the front is also an essential winter apparel item, so get one for the runner dude in your life.

Favourite part of Christmas / holiday season?

Trevor:  Spending time with family and friends.

Kate: Hmmm, my dad’s fruit salad on Christmas morning is something I always look forward to. If I’m at home, I love to run on Christmas day with my younger brother on the snowy roads in Northern Ontario, it’s not fast but it’s always fun.

Catherine:  My favourite parts of Christmas are the traditions. Going out with the family to get the tree, decorating the tree while drinking hot chocolate and eating Christmas cookies and reminiscing about where the ornaments came from. I also love the food !!

Dylan: Eating & Drinking with friends and family.  I also like to getting out for a run on Christmas Day every year. Now it’s with my two little girls! We’ll see how long that tradition lasts…

Leslie:  I usually have a pretty quiet Christmas day because I race the Boxing Day 10-miler the following day in Hamilton, Ontario. After that I visit family and refuel with the traditional Christmas turkey dinner. I always bring desserts: homemade brownies and Nanaimo bars.

Some of our favourite places to shop for running gifts:

Looking for gift certificates to local races? They’re currently available for the Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k as well as the Under Armour Eastside 10k.

 

healthy winter

Healthy options for winter

By | Nutrition, Training Tips | No Comments

When the weather gets colder, meals typically get warmer. People go into hibernation mode in the winter, and crave heartier meals.  Suddenly creamy soups, pastas, and stews become far more appetizing than they did in the summer. Unfortunately, some of these meals may make your pants fit a little tighter if you opt for a decadent dish at every chance you get. However, there are so many ways to make healthy and delicious meals that are just as satisfying as their heftier counterparts.

Eat seasonal produce

The summer has fresh berries and summer vegetables, whereas the winter is laden with winter squash, apples, pears, cauliflower, potatoes, and other root vegetables that are staples for any winter meal.  Plus, they taste exponentially better than they did in the summer as they’re actually in season. They don’t cost a fortune as they’re in abundance, so you can eat well without putting a dent in your wallet.

Bulk up your salads

Salads seem to be deemed a summer meal, but that doesn’t have to be the case. Top off your usual greens with roasted potatoes or yams, toasted nuts, crispy chickpeas, or grilled meat/tofu to enhance the meal. Even adding grains like quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice or barley will up the ante and ensure you’re incorporating healthy whole grains. Finish it off with fresh fruit, or crumbly cheese and you’ll be rethinking your views on winter salads.

Fill up on soup, stew, and chilli

Restaurant versions of these options can be loaded with cream, butter, and other delicious, but no-so-healthy ingredients. However, if made at home they can be a healthy and time-saving option for dinner.  They usually make lots of leftovers that are fantastic for lunch at work. It’s easy to throw in a lot of vegetables into these meals to not only bulk up the dish, but to increase the nutritional value too.

Be creative with healthy alternatives

Some of the classic comfort meals like mac & cheese, fettuccine alfredo, or creamy soups are loaded with heavy cream and butter. There are lots of ways to make healthy versions of these meals with seasonal ingredients that won’t break the bank.  Whip up cauli-fredo sauce, instead of the classic alfredo. Or use pureed squash and chicken stock instead of cream in your mac & cheese sauce. There are many ways to create nutritious options. Unsure of how to substitute? Just ask Google and a multitude of options will appear.

Don’t skip dessert

When produce is fresh, it’s sweet enough to make dessert without requiring large amounts of sugar. Simple options like baked apple crumble, or sweet potato brownies, are healthier options that incorporate the natural sweetness from fruits and vegetables while adding a nutritious punch.

race ends

What to do when the race ends

By | Training Tips | No Comments

When training for an “A” race, it’s easy to get used to the hustle and bustle of a structured workout routine. For some, their social life may take a hit when training is at it’s highest. For others there may be some sacrifices in their diet. Whatever the lifestyle changes are, they become a choice, not a sacrifice after a while.

Post-marathon (or any other distance), the post-race blues are not an imaginary thing. It happens to many runners, and may feel like a strange emotion to have after a big accomplishment. Having a good cry, or thorough debriefing time after a race, is healthy. It allows you to feel all of the emotions that come with achieving a goal that may not have surfaced on the day.

Big races and goals require incredible focus and dedication.  That’s what makes the culmination of efforts so sweet on race day, or so bitter if it goes sideways.  Whatever the result is, accomplishing a big goal can leave people feeling a little lost once it’s all said and done. So what do you do once the race ends? If you’re feeling a little lost, keep these things in mind to help you get back on track.

Bask in the rest

Your body needs a rest after a big effort not only physically, but mentally and emotionally too.  It’s incredibly draining to work so hard for so long, so let all of your systems recover. Physically you might feel good to get back on the training horse after a few days, but your body will need at least week or two to fully recover.

Mentally, you need a break from structured training as it took a lot of mental focus to make it through an entire training block.  Emotionally, you’ve challenged yourself to do something outside of your comfort zone. By either trying a new distance, or aiming to set a new personal best, you became vulnerable in doing so and letting those who are nearest and dearest to you what you wanted to do.  All those things take energy, and combined can be exhausting.  After the race, let all of those elements recover and rebuild for the next thing.

Enjoy the break in routine

Regimented training is great, and allows for consistency. It’s not until the end of a build, when the race is done, that you realize just how much time all that training took. While recovering and determining what your next challenge will be, enjoy the time away from structure. If you would rather nap instead of running, you can do so without guilt.  If you want to hike with friends, or go skiing, or just try something new, now’s the time! Go out, have fun, and spend quality time with the people who supported you on your journey.

Start to plan

After a certain amount of time, most runners become antsy. It’s at that time that you start to scheme and plan the next race for the race calendar. When the fire has ignited again to start back into training, you’ll know it’s the right time.  It’s worth taking a few days to ease back into things, and not go too crazy right off the bat. Use the previous race’s experience to devise a plan that will put you in an even better position for the next build. Think about adding in other workouts, or cross-training, or strength/core work.  All these elements will add diversity to a program and keep things feeling fresh.

Ease into it

After a few weeks off after a race season, it’s important to remember you won’t be starting off exactly where you left off. Some fitness will be lost, and your strength may have decreased. With that in mind, ease back into training with a few shorter runs to start, then add in some strides after runs, then get into workouts. There’s no sense in hammering out a workout on the first day back as it could result in injury, or in muscle soreness that requires a few days off to alleviate it. Take your time getting back into a routine, add in some cross-training to avoid intense DOMS, and remember to have fun.

Like anything, there are ebbs and flows with training cycles. While it may feel hard to take a break after a great race, it’s necessary.  Your body will thank you for the time off, and will be ready to take on whatever is thrown at it next.  So, enjoy the down time and you’ll be ready to rock for any subsequent races!

cold weather essentials

Cold weather essentials

By | Training Tips | No Comments

As the days get colder, the need for proper winter attire becomes more essential.  On the west coast we’re fortunate to have fairly mild winters compared to the typically snow-ridden eastern compatriots. However, if this year’s winter is anything like last year, we’ll all be pulling out our Yak Traks and coziest winter apparel as some point this season.

Our bodies generally require a longer warmup for workouts when running in colder temperatures. However, they also cool down exponentially faster after workouts. Take this into consideration when dressing for the elements.  Starting a run off looking like the Michelin Man may initially feel like a good idea, but when you start to overheat and have to lug all of your kit for your run, it’s not ideal. On the other hand, if you wear too little, you may warm up eventually but you’ll be freezing as soon as you stop moving. So here are some things to keep in mind:

Dress in layers.

Ideally have a thin, moisture wicking shirt against your skin. Top that with a light-weight jacket or vest depending on the temperatures. Keeping your core warm is crucial, so when it’s really cold out, opting for a vest and jacket isn’t a bad option.

Opt for tights.

Whether they’re half tights, or full tights, wearing an extra layer on your legs will help keep the muscles warm while they work. Cold muscles put you at risk of injury as they won’t be able to warmup enough to feel fluid in their movements.  Wearing a pair of tights, or looser fitting pants for more bashful folks, will keep your body heat from escaping too fast and will consequently keep your legs warmer.

Don’t forget your head.

Most of our body heat is lost through our heads. Some people find hats too warm even on the coldest of days, so will opt for headbands/ear warmers instead. Both options will keep your ears, and head warm.

Maintain your dexterity.

Even in above freezing temperatures, it’s wise to wear a thin pair of gloves.  Depending on the weather, thin, wind-resistant gloves are great in above freezing temperatures, whereas heavier water-proof mitts are ideal for below freezing chills. Frozen hands are incredibly uncomfortable, and make it difficult to do anything after your run.  Have a pair of gloves on hand to avoid battling with your keys to turn on your car, or fighting to change into warm clothes.

Dry feet are happy feet.

The duration of your run will help determine the need for waterproof shoes. If you plan on being out for a long run, it might be worth wearing waterproof shoes that will delay any discomfort that occurs from cold and wet feet. If you’re out for a short run, wet feet won’t matter as much if you’re heading straight home. Just make sure to stuff your shoes with newspaper, and place them by a heater in order to dry faster.

Protect your eyes and skin.

If snow has fallen, and it’s still bright out, protect your skin and eyes.  The sun’s harmful UV rays can still pass through clouds. In addition to hitting your skin, the reflection from snow can make the intensity that much stronger. Use sunscreen on bright days, and use sunglasses to protect your eyes.

It’ll take a few runs to figure out how hot you run, or how cold you stay while outside training. Just remember that as long as the footing is okay, and you’ve dressed properly, any weather is runnable!

Proper sports bra fitting

By | Training Tips | No Comments

Running can be unreasonably uncomfortable without proper sports bra fitting. Without the proper support, sensitive breast tissue can tear and cause irreversible damage. The materials in a sports bra will wear out with use, just like with a pair of shoes. When your bra celebrates a birthday, it might be time to retire it to low impact activities.

Good breast health requires proper support for your unique size and shape. What works for Mary in a size 34B will surely be a disaster for Ellie who wears a 40DD. Here are some quick tips and considerations for your next sports bra!

  • First off, don’t be shy to ask a sales associate for help. They will be more familiar with the products and make your fitting process more efficient.
  • Having a clear idea of what you are looking for in a bra and what type of physical activity it will be used for is critical.
  • When shopping, make sure you give yourself enough time. Rushing through a bra fit will leave you frustrated and walking away with the wrong fit!
  • When trying on bras, don’t be afraid to try different cup sizes. Most brands fit differently depending on their style and your individual body type.
  • If the bra chafes, allows excessive movement, rides up, or gapes under the arm, keep trying!
  • A proper fitting sports bra should fit more snug than a regular lingerie bra.
  • Breasts should be contained completely within the bra cups, with no overflow.
  • Underwire bras should sit next to the rib cage, directly below the breast tissue.
  • Wider straps provide comfort by distributing weight more evenly, thus helping to prevent back or shoulder discomfort.
  • With a properly fitted sports bra, you should be able to slip two fingers snugly between the band and the skin, as well as under the strap at the top of the shoulders.
Bra Tops and Shelf Bras

Both bra tops and shelf bras are designed for low impact activity. A bra top is a basic shelf bra that is sewn into a tank. Although sizing varies from extra small to extra-large, they will not provide maximum support for a cup size larger than B.

Support & Shape Bras

Support and shape bras are designed for medium to high impact. A wide range of supportive features includes; thicker straps, underwire, adjustable clasps, and racer back design. These types of bras range from A to DD, and sometimes E.

Compression and Full Motion Control Bras

Compression Bras are designed to firmly hold the breasts against the body and are ideal for high impact activities.

Some bras with full encapsulation and compression have underwire and are higher cut in the neckline to provide maximum support. These types of bras are best suited for women with cup sizes larger than a B.

Thanks to Rackets & Runners for this valuable information. Be sure to visit them if you have any questions or need help with proper fitting.

What Elite Athletes Eat: Marathon Edition

By | Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

For anyone racing a marathon, either for their first or fiftieth time, the pre-race dinner is always a hot topic.

What should you eat?

What should you avoid?

Is carb-loading really all it’s cracked up to be?

We may not have the exact answers, but what we’ve learned over time is that it’s best to eat what you’re used to, and that a carbohydrate-rich meal is a go-to for most runners.  There is a large Canadian elite contingent coming to race at the Canadian Marathon Championships at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, so we took the chance to ask them what fuels their fire the night before a big race.

Sami Jibril: When I’m out of town, maintaining a routine diet has its challenges. I personally try to pack at least one meal and snacks for long out of town races but when its not possible, and I am stuck in an airport with limited food options, I need to be flexible. I understand unhealthy food is better than no food, but healthy food (good fuel) is even better.

The most important factors I consider for selecting meals is food that is high in carbohydrates and easy to digest. The simpler the foods the better, and nothing unfamiliar.

Living in the Toronto and running STWM I have the luxury to eat a personal homemade meal the night before my race. I typically eat a heavy meatless pasta/spaghetti dinner with lots of veggies and I binge on fruits for dessert.

Leslie Sexton: My go-to meal before long runs and workouts when I’m at home is usually beef or chicken kabobs with grilled vegetables (splashed with a bit of olive oil and balsamic vinegar) and linguine with pesto sauce. I love cooking on the BBQ during the summer because it adds a bit of flavour and usually requires less clean-up. And of course some chocolate for dessert!

Kevin Coffey:  The last supper isn’t much of a change from the usual meal before a focused long run. I never experiment with new foods and I try to keep the fibre as low as I can.  For my last meal before a big race, I will have Thai gluten free stir fry rice noodles with a simple tomato sauce and half a serving of chicken (60g-75g of carbohydrate) with a refreshing glass of sports drink (30g carbohydrate). I have found gluten free pasta works best for my stomach and it often has less fibre than whole wheat.

Catherine Watkins: My favourite pre-race food is simply chicken or salmon with brown rice and veggies. For the marathon, I’ll go heavier on the rice and lighter on the veggies!  If it’s a shorter race and out of town I find sushi is a great pre-race food. Usually a salmon roll, tuna roll, and avocado roll.

Natasha LeBeaud Anzures: Before a race, I love to have a giant veggie-packed salad topped with my all-time favorite food: beets.  I love a big serving of brown race pasta (I have Celiac disease, so I cannot have any gluten) with marinara sauce and a side of salmon.

Trevor Hofbauer: My pre-race meal while traveling is pasta with a cream sauce and chicken. Regular pasta with a tomato sauce is an appropriate alternative as well.  For STWM, I’m actually bringing my pre-race dinner with me from Guelph. It will be my staple carbohydrate meal; cornmeal, sweet potato, chicken breast.

John Mason: The night and even through the week leading up to the race I eat a lot of bread.  I eat a lot of bread in general, but even more in the last few days heading into a marathon.  In 2015 before STWM I ate 4 loaves of bread in the last 36 hours leading into the race, an entire loaf of bread for dinner as I was strolling the streets of Toronto.  Bread and butter really is my marathon “bread and butter”.

running while travelling

Running tips while travelling

By | Uncategorised | No Comments

When away on vacation, going for a run may seem like too much effort.  Where is there to run? Who will run with me? What if I get lost? There are a lot of variables when running in an area that you’re not familiar with. However, if you do the research, and have the motivation to lace up your shoes while away, there’s no reason for missing runs while travelling.

Be prepared

If the thought of running while on vacation has flickered through your mind, make sure you pack the essentials. Depending on where you’re travelling to, pack the necessary gear to be able to run comfortably in the destination’s climate. Looking at the weather forecast will help you avoid over-packing. Grabbing a versatile pair of running shoes, and a couple outfits should be enough to get you through the holiday.

Scout out popular routes

Thankfully, like most things in the world, there’s an app for that. Many runners have some kind of GPS watch that will record their running route. If they upload this data into any app such as MapMyRun, Strava, Garmin Connect etc., it can be available to the public to view. In addition, some sites have heat maps that show the most popular areas to run. Stick to previously run routes, or ‘hot’ areas, so the likelihood of having other people around increases.

Sign up for a race

This is the easiest way to get a run in. Even if it’s not a goal race, you’ll get to see the city without worrying about traffic, and possibly get a good workout in!  Even looking up other race maps can give some ideas on where to run too. After the race, knowing some of the areas that you ran through can give some insight on other areas to check out on a subsequent run.

Connect with the locals

Most cities will have run groups either out of running stores, or with local clubs/crews. Check out their websites, or ask a local running store about your options and hop in with the group. It’s a great way to run with others, see the sights without worry, and learn some good routes.

Ask your hotel

Hotels are a wealth of knowledge. Typically staffed with locals, the concierges or receptionists will likely know of local parks or popular areas to run in even if they aren’t runners themselves. If all else fails, utilize the hotel’s fitness centre. Most hotel will have at least one treadmill to get in some extra miles, even if it’s not the most scenic of options.

Look on a map

If you’re in a city, either check out a guide book, or look online at a map of the area. Local parks, trails, stadiums, and schools will likely be listed and can give insight to what’s available. If you need to get a workout in, there’s usually a track that’s available for public use.  It may not be rubberized, but it’ll be 400m of undisturbed running.

The internet is going to be your friend while travelling. From running apps, to online maps, and city pages, everything you need to know will be on there.  If you don’t feel like researching, just lace up your shoes, write the hotel’s address on your hand, and get outside.  Someone will be able to help you if you get lost!

evan dunfee

Walking vs Running: one man’s very specific case study by Evan Dunfee

By | Elite Athletes | No Comments

Over the last 12 months it has become a fairly common occurrence for the Vancouver running community to see me out on the streets tackling a road race.  Over the last year I have walked in 10km, half marathon and full marathon races, and ran a 10km and a half marathon.

This dabbling in running during my off-season has led to a lot of questions. How often do you run in training? How does racing/recovery differ? Why do you do it?

And I think it would be fun to attempt to answer some of these questions by comparing my two most recent road races, the Scotiabank Half Marathon, where I race walked to a 95th place finish in 1:29:54, and the recent Eastside 10km, where I ran my way to 6th place in 32:26.

evan dunfee

So just how much running do I do in training? Since May 1st I’ve run 120km (not including a few 3km late night runs/plods home from the bar), or a whopping average of 6km per week. Evidently running isn’t something I find myself doing in training too often.

That lack of running most clearly rears its ugly head when it comes to recovering from running races vs. walking races. I can typically bounce back from a 30-40min hard walking effort either later that day or the next day. However, after running the Eastside 10k my legs were shot.

evan dunfee

Race walking, because of its lower impact, takes way less of a strain physically on your body (think somewhere between swimming and running). Plus, given that it’s my primary form of training, my body is primed to handle the specific stressors exceptionally well. Running however, requires way more calf/quad activation, and the higher impact takes its toll on my joints and ITBs.

Additionally, after most of my walking races my focus is on recovering as quickly as possible because I’m mid-season. After Eastside the focus was getting home ASAP to shower and head downtown to celebrate the end of my off-season. With drinks at the White Caps game and a late night concert, my body woke up the next day with considerably more DOMS.

There are many more similarities (think physiological measures: %VO2max, HR etc…) than there are differences. One difference, while running, is how easily my mind wanders. Not having to focus on technique freed up mental capacity. Unfortunately, that mental capacity was used to frequently question: “Why are you doing this to yourself?”. It’s tough to say if that is a positive or negative difference.

Another big difference was the overwhelming lack of expectations. When I go into a walking race I roughly know what I should be capable of. Sometimes this is a hindrance where I might hold back subconsciously. With running, I had no idea what to expect. I figured a good strategy was to make sure I ran hard enough that I was tired by 3km and then just hang on from there.

But moreover, no one else had any real expectations. I could have run 34min and people still would have thought that was pretty good for a race walker. Special shoutout here to my retired teammate/full-time lawyer Inaki Gomez who busted out a 35min run! He lost the fastest lawyer battle when Lanni Marchant pulled away from him late in the game.

Talking about others helps me segue into my final point, which is the real reason I come out to these races (running or walking). That reason is to sneak my way into the amazing running community we have in Vancouver. A community which I used to feel like an outsider in but now, finally, feel like I am welcome. Doing these events has helped show that we race walkers are serious athletes. I think that it has helped raise the level of respect we walkers have. It has also brought me way closer to this incredible community. From the awesome run clubs around the city, to the strong Strava contingent constantly pursuing personal excellence. These are the people I draw constant inspiration from. So if it means putting up with a few days of sore ITBs and calf cramps each year then it is well worth the price!

ideal workout

When’s your ideal workout time?

By | Training Tips | No Comments

It’s hard to say when the ideal workout time is.  It’s a personal preference, but any option has it’s advantages. Some people can’t fathom rolling out of bed, into their running shoes and heading out the door before they’re truly awake. Others can’t imagine running in the heat of the afternoon, or in the darkness of night.  What works for one person, doesn’t always work for someone else. It comes down to running when it works best for you, your schedule, and your mind. Here are the advantages and disadvantages of each time of day:

Morning runner:

Getting out of bed and going out for a run straight away is great for several reasons.  If you have a high-stress job that doesn’t have a clock-out time, running first thing in the morning will help you avoid missing workouts after work.  It can help boost your focus for the day, and kick-start your metabolism. Furthermore, it can lead to making healthier decisions throughout the day as you’ll have started your day on a high note. In terms of the run itself, there are usually less people out and about early in the day, so you won’t have to battle crowds on popular running routes in your city.

The downsides to running in the morning are due to our body’s physical state.  Body temperatures when you wake up are lower than later in the day. As a result our muscles, tendons and ligaments are colder and need some extra time to warm up.  If an adequate warmup isn’t done, it increases the risk of injury. Additionally, lung function is poor due to the lungs being more constricted and inefficient bringing oxygen in after a night’s sleep your. The inefficient oxygen intake makes hard efforts can seem more difficult early in the morning.

Afternoon/evening runner:

Working out later in the day allows the body to get moving and have the blood flowing through your muscles, ligaments and tendons. The body is a fine-tuned machine, that varies the amount of circulating hormones depending on the time of day.  In the afternoon/evening, testosterone levels are higher.  Thus, the afternoon is a great time for any strength or power workouts. In addition, cortisol (a stress hormone which aids in the storage of fat and reduction in muscle tissue) levels decrease throughout the day. Lower cortisol levels help to gain muscle mass.  Post-work times are typically safer to be out in too.  More people are doing post-work errands, or their own workouts, so areas are more populated and safer to run through.

Despite all the great things the afternoon has to offer, there are downfalls.  Leaving workouts to later in the day are seen to be easier to miss.  After a long day of work, when energy is low, it’s easy to lose motivation and opt out of a workout.  Especially in jobs that don’t have a set end time.  If you get caught up in a project, work later, and end up fuelling improperly, it’s not surprising if a workout gets missed.  There are no real physical downfalls, only psychological.  So if your will power is high and you prefer the evening routine, you’re good to go!

Whatever time you decide on, it’ll be the best time for you and your schedule.  There are pros and cons to any situation, just do whatever gets you into your shoes and outside!

Under Armour Eastside 10k Recap

By | Eastside 10k | No Comments

The Under Armour Eastside 10K was an amazing success! It was great to see so many runners come out and support the Eastside community and we couldn’t have asked for better conditions for the run.

Here are some of the race-day highlights:

In case you missed it, Lanni Marchant appeared on Breakfast Television Vancouver on Friday to talk about the Eastside 10K and how to go from the couch to a 10k in no time. Click Here to watch the segment. Lanni also made an appearance at race packet pick-up on Friday to chat with runners and sign autographs for runners in attendance.

Here are some race day stats:

There were approximately 2,800 participants in the race with family and friends cheering along the route!

The top male finisher was Geoff Martinson with a time of 30:00. Justin Kent and Kevin Coffey finished with times of 30:17 and 30:38 respectively to round out the top three.

The top female finisher was Sarah Inglis with a time of 33:45. Leslie Sexton and Natasha Wodak finished with times of 34:00 and 34:32 respectively to round out the top three.

Under Armour athlete and Canadian marathon and half-marathon record holder Lanni Marchant placed an encouraging fourth in 34:37 as she continues her comeback from illness.

Close to $17,000 has been raised to date from the fundraising efforts of our competitors for the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, the Greater Vancouver Food Bank, and PHS Community Services Society.

Thank you for making the Under Armour Eastside 10K such an incredible experience. See you again next year! Please share your race day pics on Instagram using #UAEastside10K.