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Kim Doerksen

Proper sports bra fitting

By | Training Tips | No Comments

Running can be unreasonably uncomfortable without proper sports bra fitting. Without the proper support, sensitive breast tissue can tear and cause irreversible damage. The materials in a sports bra will wear out with use, just like with a pair of shoes. When your bra celebrates a birthday, it might be time to retire it to low impact activities.

Good breast health requires proper support for your unique size and shape. What works for Mary in a size 34B will surely be a disaster for Ellie who wears a 40DD. Here are some quick tips and considerations for your next sports bra!

  • First off, don’t be shy to ask a sales associate for help. They will be more familiar with the products and make your fitting process more efficient.
  • Having a clear idea of what you are looking for in a bra and what type of physical activity it will be used for is critical.
  • When shopping, make sure you give yourself enough time. Rushing through a bra fit will leave you frustrated and walking away with the wrong fit!
  • When trying on bras, don’t be afraid to try different cup sizes. Most brands fit differently depending on their style and your individual body type.
  • If the bra chafes, allows excessive movement, rides up, or gapes under the arm, keep trying!
  • A proper fitting sports bra should fit more snug than a regular lingerie bra.
  • Breasts should be contained completely within the bra cups, with no overflow.
  • Underwire bras should sit next to the rib cage, directly below the breast tissue.
  • Wider straps provide comfort by distributing weight more evenly, thus helping to prevent back or shoulder discomfort.
  • With a properly fitted sports bra, you should be able to slip two fingers snugly between the band and the skin, as well as under the strap at the top of the shoulders.
Bra Tops and Shelf Bras

Both bra tops and shelf bras are designed for low impact activity. A bra top is a basic shelf bra that is sewn into a tank. Although sizing varies from extra small to extra-large, they will not provide maximum support for a cup size larger than B.

Support & Shape Bras

Support and shape bras are designed for medium to high impact. A wide range of supportive features includes; thicker straps, underwire, adjustable clasps, and racer back design. These types of bras range from A to DD, and sometimes E.

Compression and Full Motion Control Bras

Compression Bras are designed to firmly hold the breasts against the body and are ideal for high impact activities.

Some bras with full encapsulation and compression have underwire and are higher cut in the neckline to provide maximum support. These types of bras are best suited for women with cup sizes larger than a B.

Thanks to Rackets & Runners for this valuable information. Be sure to visit them if you have any questions or need help with proper fitting.

What Elite Athletes Eat: Marathon Edition

By | Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

For anyone racing a marathon, either for their first or fiftieth time, the pre-race dinner is always a hot topic.

What should you eat?

What should you avoid?

Is carb-loading really all it’s cracked up to be?

We may not have the exact answers, but what we’ve learned over time is that it’s best to eat what you’re used to, and that a carbohydrate-rich meal is a go-to for most runners.  There is a large Canadian elite contingent coming to race at the Canadian Marathon Championships at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, so we took the chance to ask them what fuels their fire the night before a big race.

Sami Jibril: When I’m out of town, maintaining a routine diet has its challenges. I personally try to pack at least one meal and snacks for long out of town races but when its not possible, and I am stuck in an airport with limited food options, I need to be flexible. I understand unhealthy food is better than no food, but healthy food (good fuel) is even better.

The most important factors I consider for selecting meals is food that is high in carbohydrates and easy to digest. The simpler the foods the better, and nothing unfamiliar.

Living in the Toronto and running STWM I have the luxury to eat a personal homemade meal the night before my race. I typically eat a heavy meatless pasta/spaghetti dinner with lots of veggies and I binge on fruits for dessert.

Leslie Sexton: My go-to meal before long runs and workouts when I’m at home is usually beef or chicken kabobs with grilled vegetables (splashed with a bit of olive oil and balsamic vinegar) and linguine with pesto sauce. I love cooking on the BBQ during the summer because it adds a bit of flavour and usually requires less clean-up. And of course some chocolate for dessert!

Kevin Coffey:  The last supper isn’t much of a change from the usual meal before a focused long run. I never experiment with new foods and I try to keep the fibre as low as I can.  For my last meal before a big race, I will have Thai gluten free stir fry rice noodles with a simple tomato sauce and half a serving of chicken (60g-75g of carbohydrate) with a refreshing glass of sports drink (30g carbohydrate). I have found gluten free pasta works best for my stomach and it often has less fibre than whole wheat.

Catherine Watkins: My favourite pre-race food is simply chicken or salmon with brown rice and veggies. For the marathon, I’ll go heavier on the rice and lighter on the veggies!  If it’s a shorter race and out of town I find sushi is a great pre-race food. Usually a salmon roll, tuna roll, and avocado roll.

Natasha LeBeaud Anzures: Before a race, I love to have a giant veggie-packed salad topped with my all-time favorite food: beets.  I love a big serving of brown race pasta (I have Celiac disease, so I cannot have any gluten) with marinara sauce and a side of salmon.

Trevor Hofbauer: My pre-race meal while traveling is pasta with a cream sauce and chicken. Regular pasta with a tomato sauce is an appropriate alternative as well.  For STWM, I’m actually bringing my pre-race dinner with me from Guelph. It will be my staple carbohydrate meal; cornmeal, sweet potato, chicken breast.

John Mason: The night and even through the week leading up to the race I eat a lot of bread.  I eat a lot of bread in general, but even more in the last few days heading into a marathon.  In 2015 before STWM I ate 4 loaves of bread in the last 36 hours leading into the race, an entire loaf of bread for dinner as I was strolling the streets of Toronto.  Bread and butter really is my marathon “bread and butter”.

running while travelling

Running tips while travelling

By | Uncategorised | No Comments

When away on vacation, going for a run may seem like too much effort.  Where is there to run? Who will run with me? What if I get lost? There are a lot of variables when running in an area that you’re not familiar with. However, if you do the research, and have the motivation to lace up your shoes while away, there’s no reason for missing runs while travelling.

Be prepared

If the thought of running while on vacation has flickered through your mind, make sure you pack the essentials. Depending on where you’re travelling to, pack the necessary gear to be able to run comfortably in the destination’s climate. Looking at the weather forecast will help you avoid over-packing. Grabbing a versatile pair of running shoes, and a couple outfits should be enough to get you through the holiday.

Scout out popular routes

Thankfully, like most things in the world, there’s an app for that. Many runners have some kind of GPS watch that will record their running route. If they upload this data into any app such as MapMyRun, Strava, Garmin Connect etc., it can be available to the public to view. In addition, some sites have heat maps that show the most popular areas to run. Stick to previously run routes, or ‘hot’ areas, so the likelihood of having other people around increases.

Sign up for a race

This is the easiest way to get a run in. Even if it’s not a goal race, you’ll get to see the city without worrying about traffic, and possibly get a good workout in!  Even looking up other race maps can give some ideas on where to run too. After the race, knowing some of the areas that you ran through can give some insight on other areas to check out on a subsequent run.

Connect with the locals

Most cities will have run groups either out of running stores, or with local clubs/crews. Check out their websites, or ask a local running store about your options and hop in with the group. It’s a great way to run with others, see the sights without worry, and learn some good routes.

Ask your hotel

Hotels are a wealth of knowledge. Typically staffed with locals, the concierges or receptionists will likely know of local parks or popular areas to run in even if they aren’t runners themselves. If all else fails, utilize the hotel’s fitness centre. Most hotel will have at least one treadmill to get in some extra miles, even if it’s not the most scenic of options.

Look on a map

If you’re in a city, either check out a guide book, or look online at a map of the area. Local parks, trails, stadiums, and schools will likely be listed and can give insight to what’s available. If you need to get a workout in, there’s usually a track that’s available for public use.  It may not be rubberized, but it’ll be 400m of undisturbed running.

The internet is going to be your friend while travelling. From running apps, to online maps, and city pages, everything you need to know will be on there.  If you don’t feel like researching, just lace up your shoes, write the hotel’s address on your hand, and get outside.  Someone will be able to help you if you get lost!

evan dunfee

Walking vs Running: one man’s very specific case study by Evan Dunfee

By | Elite Athletes | No Comments

Over the last 12 months it has become a fairly common occurrence for the Vancouver running community to see me out on the streets tackling a road race.  Over the last year I have walked in 10km, half marathon and full marathon races, and ran a 10km and a half marathon.

This dabbling in running during my off-season has led to a lot of questions. How often do you run in training? How does racing/recovery differ? Why do you do it?

And I think it would be fun to attempt to answer some of these questions by comparing my two most recent road races, the Scotiabank Half Marathon, where I race walked to a 95th place finish in 1:29:54, and the recent Eastside 10km, where I ran my way to 6th place in 32:26.

evan dunfee

So just how much running do I do in training? Since May 1st I’ve run 120km (not including a few 3km late night runs/plods home from the bar), or a whopping average of 6km per week. Evidently running isn’t something I find myself doing in training too often.

That lack of running most clearly rears its ugly head when it comes to recovering from running races vs. walking races. I can typically bounce back from a 30-40min hard walking effort either later that day or the next day. However, after running the Eastside 10k my legs were shot.

evan dunfee

Race walking, because of its lower impact, takes way less of a strain physically on your body (think somewhere between swimming and running). Plus, given that it’s my primary form of training, my body is primed to handle the specific stressors exceptionally well. Running however, requires way more calf/quad activation, and the higher impact takes its toll on my joints and ITBs.

Additionally, after most of my walking races my focus is on recovering as quickly as possible because I’m mid-season. After Eastside the focus was getting home ASAP to shower and head downtown to celebrate the end of my off-season. With drinks at the White Caps game and a late night concert, my body woke up the next day with considerably more DOMS.

There are many more similarities (think physiological measures: %VO2max, HR etc…) than there are differences. One difference, while running, is how easily my mind wanders. Not having to focus on technique freed up mental capacity. Unfortunately, that mental capacity was used to frequently question: “Why are you doing this to yourself?”. It’s tough to say if that is a positive or negative difference.

Another big difference was the overwhelming lack of expectations. When I go into a walking race I roughly know what I should be capable of. Sometimes this is a hindrance where I might hold back subconsciously. With running, I had no idea what to expect. I figured a good strategy was to make sure I ran hard enough that I was tired by 3km and then just hang on from there.

But moreover, no one else had any real expectations. I could have run 34min and people still would have thought that was pretty good for a race walker. Special shoutout here to my retired teammate/full-time lawyer Inaki Gomez who busted out a 35min run! He lost the fastest lawyer battle when Lanni Marchant pulled away from him late in the game.

Talking about others helps me segue into my final point, which is the real reason I come out to these races (running or walking). That reason is to sneak my way into the amazing running community we have in Vancouver. A community which I used to feel like an outsider in but now, finally, feel like I am welcome. Doing these events has helped show that we race walkers are serious athletes. I think that it has helped raise the level of respect we walkers have. It has also brought me way closer to this incredible community. From the awesome run clubs around the city, to the strong Strava contingent constantly pursuing personal excellence. These are the people I draw constant inspiration from. So if it means putting up with a few days of sore ITBs and calf cramps each year then it is well worth the price!

ideal workout

When’s your ideal workout time?

By | Training Tips | No Comments

It’s hard to say when the ideal workout time is.  It’s a personal preference, but any option has it’s advantages. Some people can’t fathom rolling out of bed, into their running shoes and heading out the door before they’re truly awake. Others can’t imagine running in the heat of the afternoon, or in the darkness of night.  What works for one person, doesn’t always work for someone else. It comes down to running when it works best for you, your schedule, and your mind. Here are the advantages and disadvantages of each time of day:

Morning runner:

Getting out of bed and going out for a run straight away is great for several reasons.  If you have a high-stress job that doesn’t have a clock-out time, running first thing in the morning will help you avoid missing workouts after work.  It can help boost your focus for the day, and kick-start your metabolism. Furthermore, it can lead to making healthier decisions throughout the day as you’ll have started your day on a high note. In terms of the run itself, there are usually less people out and about early in the day, so you won’t have to battle crowds on popular running routes in your city.

The downsides to running in the morning are due to our body’s physical state.  Body temperatures when you wake up are lower than later in the day. As a result our muscles, tendons and ligaments are colder and need some extra time to warm up.  If an adequate warmup isn’t done, it increases the risk of injury. Additionally, lung function is poor due to the lungs being more constricted and inefficient bringing oxygen in after a night’s sleep your. The inefficient oxygen intake makes hard efforts can seem more difficult early in the morning.

Afternoon/evening runner:

Working out later in the day allows the body to get moving and have the blood flowing through your muscles, ligaments and tendons. The body is a fine-tuned machine, that varies the amount of circulating hormones depending on the time of day.  In the afternoon/evening, testosterone levels are higher.  Thus, the afternoon is a great time for any strength or power workouts. In addition, cortisol (a stress hormone which aids in the storage of fat and reduction in muscle tissue) levels decrease throughout the day. Lower cortisol levels help to gain muscle mass.  Post-work times are typically safer to be out in too.  More people are doing post-work errands, or their own workouts, so areas are more populated and safer to run through.

Despite all the great things the afternoon has to offer, there are downfalls.  Leaving workouts to later in the day are seen to be easier to miss.  After a long day of work, when energy is low, it’s easy to lose motivation and opt out of a workout.  Especially in jobs that don’t have a set end time.  If you get caught up in a project, work later, and end up fuelling improperly, it’s not surprising if a workout gets missed.  There are no real physical downfalls, only psychological.  So if your will power is high and you prefer the evening routine, you’re good to go!

Whatever time you decide on, it’ll be the best time for you and your schedule.  There are pros and cons to any situation, just do whatever gets you into your shoes and outside!

Under Armour Eastside 10k Recap

By | Eastside 10k | No Comments

The Under Armour Eastside 10K was an amazing success! It was great to see so many runners come out and support the Eastside community and we couldn’t have asked for better conditions for the run.

Here are some of the race-day highlights:

In case you missed it, Lanni Marchant appeared on Breakfast Television Vancouver on Friday to talk about the Eastside 10K and how to go from the couch to a 10k in no time. Click Here to watch the segment. Lanni also made an appearance at race packet pick-up on Friday to chat with runners and sign autographs for runners in attendance.

Here are some race day stats:

There were approximately 2,800 participants in the race with family and friends cheering along the route!

The top male finisher was Geoff Martinson with a time of 30:00. Justin Kent and Kevin Coffey finished with times of 30:17 and 30:38 respectively to round out the top three.

The top female finisher was Sarah Inglis with a time of 33:45. Leslie Sexton and Natasha Wodak finished with times of 34:00 and 34:32 respectively to round out the top three.

Under Armour athlete and Canadian marathon and half-marathon record holder Lanni Marchant placed an encouraging fourth in 34:37 as she continues her comeback from illness.

Close to $17,000 has been raised to date from the fundraising efforts of our competitors for the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, the Greater Vancouver Food Bank, and PHS Community Services Society.

Thank you for making the Under Armour Eastside 10K such an incredible experience. See you again next year! Please share your race day pics on Instagram using #UAEastside10K.

Sarah Inglis and Geoff Martinson win the Under Armour Eastside 10K

By | Eastside 10k | No Comments
Inline image 2
 

MEDIA RELEASE 

Sarah Inglis and Geoff Martinson win the Under Armour Eastside 10K

VANCOUVER, September 16,2017 – Geoff Martinson cruised to a comfortable victory in 30:00 at this morning’s Under Armour Eastside 10k in Vancouver.  Falkirk, Scotland’s Sarah Inglis claimed a surprise win in 33:45 in a thrilling women’s race.

A sold-out record crowd of 2,800 runners toured historic Gastown and the streets of Eastside Vancouver under sunny skies and perfect 13 degrees Celsius weather.  The fifth year of the race featured a new course that started and ended at the iconic Woodward’s building.       

Martinson took a lead pack of five through a leisurely first kilometre in 3 minutes and 2 seconds. He injected a little pace in the third kilometre and the group was whittled down to three: Martinson, Justin Kent and Kevin Coffey. Coffey didn’t survive the impressive hills between the 5 and 6 kilometres and the race came down to a dual between Martinson and Kent.  Martinson made his final surge at 8km to claim the victory. This is the second time Martinson, a former Canadian 1,500m international, has won the race.  Kent held on for second in 30:17, with Kevin Coffey third in 30:38. 

On the women’s side, last year’s champion Leslie Sexton of London, Ontario led through the first kilometre before Canadian Olympian Natasha Wodak and Sarah Inglis moved to the front and dropped her.  The Ontarian, who has been running over 200km a week in preparation for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon next month, pulled them back on the big hills after 5km, but couldn’t contain Inglis’ speed on the downhill final 2km.  At the line, Sexton was happy to be just 15 seconds back while Wodak held on for third in 34:32.  Under Armour athlete and Canadian marathon and half-marathon record holder Lanni Marchant came home an encouraging fourth in 34:37 as she continues her comeback from illness.

“I am really happy to win the race with a personal best today,” said Sarah Inglis.  “It was a great field of women this year with Natasha, Rachel and Leslie and I felt strong on the hills and great during the race. I’ve been training really well and I am looking forward to the Victoria half marathon in a couple of weeks.” 

The race was also an important fundraising event for three Eastside community charities: The Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, PHS Community Services Society, and the Greater Vancouver Food Bank. Combined, the 2,800 participants have already raised $17,000 and participants can continue to fundraise online until October 1st online at www.eastside10k.ca.

“Thanks to everyone who was part of such a spectacular morning.  The sun shone brightly over the Eastside, the athletes up front put on a show for us, and a record crowd showed they cared about our community raising money with every step,” said Race Director Clifton Cunningham. “We couldn’t have had a better day.” 

Under Armour Eastside 10k top finisher’s results:

10km Male  
1. Geoff Martinson – Vancouver, BC
30:00
2. Justin Kent – Burnaby, BC
30:17
3. Kevin Coffey – Vancouver, BC
30:38
            
10km Female 
1. Sarah Inglis – Langley, BC
33:45
2. Leslie Sexton – London, ON
34:00
3. Natasha Wodak – North Vancouver, BC
34:32
 
Information and complete race results can be found at www.eastside10k.ca   
 
For more information on Canada Running Series events, please visit www.canadarunningseries.com
About Under Armour Eastside 10k:
The Under Armour Eastside 10k is part of the prestigious Canada Running Series. As Vancouver’s premier fall 10k, it takes place in the Eastside, running for three Eastside embedded charities, with the great Eastside Community. 2,800 runners take to the streets each September to show their love for the heart of Vancouver. Canada Running Series is the nation’s premier running circuit with events in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal.  It annually attracts over 60,000 participants and raises more than $6 million for some 320 charities. Canada Running Series is strongly committed to staging great experiences for runners of all levels from first time runners, charity supporters and Canadian Olympians; and to making sport part of sustainable communities and the city-building process.  Our mission is “building community through running”. For more information please visit: www.CanadaRunningSeries.com
 
 
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For media inquiries, please contact:    
                                                                                              
Carolyn Abbass
Paradigm
416-413-5190
 
Serena Vampa
Canada Running Series
Cell: 778-549-8329
 
 
 Photo credit: Mark Bates, Canada Running Series

Race Day Tips for #UAeastside10k

By | Eastside 10k | No Comments

Every year we’re joined by hundreds of new runners at the Under Armour Eastside 10k. We’ve taken some tips from the seasoned runners out there and come up with the ABC’s of how to set yourself up for a great race – both before and after the event.

While this guide is primarily aimed at new runners, it’s always good to refresh your memory even if you’ve been racing for decades! Also be sure to check out our Race Etiquette Page.

Before the Race

A – Know where you need to be and when

This may seem obvious, but it’s so often overlooked. You can save yourself a amount of stress on Race Day (and the days leading up to it) by knowing where to go and when. This includes knowing where to pick up your race package and bib number in the days leading up to the race, as well as how to get to the start line.

  • Package Pickup – ALL participants must pick up their race package and bib number at Package Pickup before Race Day. Package Pickup is located at the SFU Segal Building — 500 Granville St (Granville @ Pender) and is open on Friday September 15th from 11:30am to 6:30pm, and Saturday September 16th in the Woodwards Atrium from 7am-8am. More details here.
  • Start Line – The run will start and finish on Cordova Street, near the Woodward’s Development. Your best way to get to the Start Area is to take public transit. To plan your trip, click here and select your starting location then choose Transit direction. Woodward’s is a short walk from either Waterfront Station or Stadium Skytrain Station. The second best way to get there is to bike, as BEST will be providing a complimentary and secure Bike Valet right beside the Start/Finish Line.A reminder that road closures will be in effect for the event, so please leave extra travel time. Recommended routes into Downtown are Hastings Street, Georgia Street, and Cambie Street Bridge.Driving to the start line? The easiest access/parking option is to take Cambie Street northbound to Cordova, then turn right to access the parking garage off of Cordova Street. Note that this access route is only possible until 8:15am, after which Cordova Street will be fully closed for the start of the race. If you are dropping someone off, please do so on Hastings Street.For full road closures details click here.

B – Don’t do anything new! We mean it!

A common mistake is to try something new just before or on Race Day. This could be anything from wearing a new pair of shoes during the run to changing up your diet the day before. If you typically eat a simple pasta the night before your training runs, don’t try out that new sushi place around the corner on Friday night. If you don’t usually have coffee before your training runs, don’t go for a double espresso on Race Day morning. Stick with what works for you – from your meals to your running clothes to your morning routine.

C – Start in the right corral

What’s a corral? In order to give everyone their best experience on Race Day, runners are typically assigned into a corral based on their predicted finish time. At the #UAeastside10k all runners will self-assign themselves to a estimated finish time.  Speedsters can start at the front of the pack while walkers start further back. Please be respectful of other runners and line up according to your expected finish time, and be honest in your approximations. Please also be mindful of other runners who may need to pass you on course.  Keep in mind the race start closes 10 minutes after the scheduled start time.  Make sure you arrive on time.

Corral colour Est. finish time Start time
Black Elites  8:30am
RedRed Corral < 50min   8:30am
Yellow CorralYellow 50–58min   8:30am
BlueBlue Corral 58–66min   8:30am
GreenGreen Corral 66min +   8:30am

Corral details for the race here.

BONUS – use our Gear Check to store a bag of warm, dry (and less-sweaty) clothes for after the race. Your $2 donation will go to our Featured Charities.


During the Race

A – Make sure your bib number is on your front and visible

We use a bib-tag timing system, which means your timing chip is embedded in your bib number. In order for it to work properly and have your time recorded:

  • Do not remove the “bibTag” or foam spacer from your bib.
  • Do not fold your bib or excessively bend or twist the “bibTag”.
  • Wear your bib on your chest/abdomen. Do not wear on your back, side, leg or arm.
  • Do not cover your bib with clothing – always make sure it is completely visible.
  • Make sure you cross over the timing mat at both the Start Line and the Finish Line.
    ***Start Line will CLOSE 10min AFTER THE SCHEDULED START TIME ***

B – Start slow and stay even

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of Race Day and start out too fast. Do the opposite – start a little slower than your normal pace and gradually pick up your pace over the first kilometre. After that, try to keep an even pace throughout the race and save your extra energy for the final push to the Finish Line!

C – Be prepared for whatever Mother Nature brings

No one knows what the weather will be in September, so it’s important to be prepared for anything. If it’s hot, bring your own water, but we’ll also have plenty of aid stations on course, serving up both water and Gatorade. If you are using one of the aid stations:

  • When approaching a hydration station, move to the side of the road, grab your fluid/nutritional needs and keep moving. There will be multiple hydration tables so if the first table is busy KEEP MOVING.
  • There will be water refill stations for those runners carrying their own bottles.
  • Throw your used cup to the side of the road as close to the hydration station as possible, ideally in one of the marked bins. Drop your cup down by your waist so you don’t hit/splash another participant. Please don’t litter on the course after passing the last aid station garbage bin.
  • If you plan to stop at the aid station, move past the tables and pull off to the side of the road.
  • Say thank you to the volunteers!

After the Race

A – Keep moving

Collect your medal as you cross the Finish Line, then keep moving through the chute until you get to the Post-Race Recovery Area. Keep moving for at least 10 more minutes afterwards to gradually bring your heart rate down and help your legs flush out that lactic acid (this will prevent you from being stiff tomorrow).

B – Refuel and rehydrate

Right after the finish line we’ll have water and Gatorade for you to rehydrate with. Grab a cup and keep walking – there will be more in the Post-Race Recovery Area. A variety of snacks will be available in the Recovery Area, including bananas, bagels, Powerbar, cookies, juice, and yogurt. The carbs will help replenish your energy stores while a bit of protein will help rebuild your muscles. Make sure you eat something within 30 minutes of crossing the line.

There will also be an Under Armour stretching station after the Finish Line, so you’ll have a designated area to do a proper cool-down and post-race stretch!

C – Get warm and enjoy the Finish Area

After you’ve fueled up, stop by Gear Check to collect your spare clothes. Even on a sunny day, your core temperature will drop fast once you stop moving, especially when you’re still wearing sweaty clothes. Once you’ve done that, check out the Awards Ceremony (9:45am).

Post-race brunch is always key. There are many excellent restaurants in the area, including The Charles Bar that is putting on a special brunch from 9:30-11:30am. You must buy a ticket ahead of time, which will be given to you at package pickup. Click here to reserve your spot!

Congratulations! Now it’s time to start planning your next race – registration for the 2018 Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon & 5k, or the 2018 Under Armour Eastside 10k opens after the race on Saturday!

eastside course

Your Guide to the Under Armour Eastside 10k

By | Uncategorised | No Comments

We know the feeling all too well, you signed up for your race ages ago and now it’s snuck up on you with less than one week to go. Here’s everything you need to know to get ready for race day:

UA Bandit banner ad
What to wear:

Make sure you’re prepared for whatever mother nature has in store for race day, whether it be hot, cold or raining. If you’re in need of new pair of running shoes, our sponsor Under Armour has shoes suitable for any type of running style and gear to keep you one step ahead of the elements. If it rains, make sure you layer up, wear quick drying gear, and wear a hat to keep the rain out of your face. In order to make sure Eastside 10K participants have the best gear possible, the top five fundraisers will receive head-to-toe Under Armour running gear and entry into the 2018 race.

Who to look out for:

On race pack pick-up day, Canadian marathon record holder and Olympian, Lanni Marchant will be on site taking pictures and signing autographs for her fans from 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m..

How to share:

Did you even really do the run if you don’t have a picture to prove it? Share your experience with fellow runners before, during, and after the run using the hashtag #UAEastside10K. Not only are we excited to see the run from your perspective, but we want you to show the world why the Under Armour Eastside 10K is the best run in Vancouver.

Who you are supporting:

The Under Armour Eastside 10K is a run in, for and with the Eastside of Vancouver. The run has partnered with three amazing charities, the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre, the Greater Vancouver Food Bank, and PHS Community Services Society.

We look forward to seeing you all on race day!

Race day etiquette & pacer information

By | Eastside 10k, Training Tips | No Comments

Race day is the most exciting part of any training build.  After months of workouts, long runs, and mentally preparing for a race all seems worth it when you finally get to pin your race bib on, and accomplish your goal.  To make a race the best experience possible, there are some race etiquette tips to keep in mind for the big day.

Before the race:

  • Read the website, entry form or other race information before contacting the race directly. All of the race details you need to know are probably there.
  • Respect entry restrictions. Check if the race permits wheelchairs or baby joggers, imposes a minimum age, or has time restrictions.
  • Pay attention to packet pickup hours. Do not show up at other times and expect to receive your race packet/number.
  • Carefully check your information at packet pickup. The time to correct any errors such as age, gender, or misspelling of your name is BEFORE the race.

Race day:

  • Keep your race bib visible. Pin your number on the FRONT of your shirt or outermost clothing. Announcers, photographers, timers and medics use it to help identify you.
  • Start in the correct corral. There is a reason why races ask for your predicted finishing time.  Slower runners and walkers should move into to the later corrals as their race bib indicates to avoid any congestion for faster runners trying to pass by. Arriving early doesn’t mean you can start at the front of the race. If you want to switch corrals, there are usually spots at package pickup to request that change.
  • Don’t make a fence.  It is incredibly frustrating to try and pass a large group of slower individuals who take up the entire width of the street during a race.  If you’re in a large group, respect other races, and stay two abreast.  If you’re walking, please remain behind the runners to avoid obstruction.
  • Pass on the left, stay to the right. If you’re speeding along, pass runners on their left. If you need to slow down, move to the right to allow others to easily pass. The first mile or so of a race can be crowded and sometimes you need to weave to pass people.  Just be aware of those around you.
  • Don’t stop dead in your tracks. If you need to stop for any reason move to the side.  Whether it’s an untied shoelace, your walk/run program, or an urgent phone call, don’t stop dead in your tracks. Look around, move to the side and slide back into the race when you’re ready.
  • Be mindful before taking mid-race photos. Many runners love documenting their journey, especially since selfies have become all the rage.  These are great mementos, but please step to the side when taking them. The last thing you want is another runner plowing through you and your phone shattering on the ground.
  • Don’t tune out. Portable headphone devices for iPods, MP3 players, phones etc are discouraged for your safety and the safety of others.  Blasting music in your ears can block out any verbal warnings/directions or sounds of vehicles/participants along the course. Be aware of your surroundings for your own safety, as well as for respecting others.
  • Be aware of other runners at water stops. If you’re skipping the water, run straight through the station and don’t crowd where the water is located.  If you need to wet your whistle, minimize congestion by grabbing quickly and move to the side once you’ve passed the water station volunteers before slowing down.
  • Listen to your body. If you’re not having a great day and decide to drop out, tell someone.  Sometimes race day doesn’t go as planned.  If you need to drop-out, be sure to tell a race volunteer so no one is looking for you afterwards.
  • Run through the finish line. Hundreds of runners are coming through behind you, so move towards the medals and snacks to avoid congestion in the finishing chute.
  • Share the post-race goodies.  After a race, the first thing runners see are the food tents.  While you’ve just burned a lot of calories during the race, remember that everyone else in the race has too.  Take one of each thing to allow every runner to replenish their energy once they cross the finish line.

Pacers

Many races have a group of volunteers that run the race to help others reach their goals.  These pacers, sometimes known as pace bunnies, are a valuable tool for staying on target for your goal.  When following a pacer, always keep an eye on your own time as well, just in case.  At the Under Armour Eastside 10k, there are 15 pacers for a number of race times.  The pacers will have matching pacer kits on, and will hold a sign with their designated pace time on it.  Hop in to whatever group matches your personal goal and let the camaraderie of others help pull you along!  The pacers will be as follows:

  • 45:00 = Lucas & Tibor
  • 50:00 = Alan & Fergus
  • 55:00 = Kenny & Shannon
  • 60:00 = Karl, Mark & Andy
  • 65:00 = Kelsey & Olivia
  • 70:00 = Erika & Evgeny
  • 75:00 = Fiona & Maryam