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Canada Running Series

Suzy Prosser overcomes trauma to attempt GUINNESS WORLD RECORD for a cause at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

By | Scotiabank Charity Challenge, Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

A traumatic event nearly caused Toronto’s Suzy Prosser to quit running altogether. A recreational runner who took up the sport as a challenge and then joined run crews as a fun way to meet people when she moved to the city five years ago, Prosser had been in the midst of training for a half-marathon with a sub-two hour time goal in mind. Out on a run one day, she was attacked.

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How to Watch the 2018 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

By | Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon | No Comments

Running fans across the globe will once again be able to catch all the action at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon – an IAAF Gold Label Race – next Sunday, October 21. 

The event is being live streamed on STWM.ca and on CBCSports.ca, athleticscanada.tv and on Twitter’s Periscope, beginning at 8:15 a.m. EDT. There will be no geo-blocking, meaning you can watch all the action from anywhere in the world. 

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Canada Running Series newcomers Mike Tate and Boneshi Woldegorgis race to Oasis ZooRun 10k victory.

By | Oasis ZooRun | No Comments

Speed River’s new recruit Mike Tate showed himself to be the class of the field as he powered his way over the hills, and around the innumerable twists and turns of the Oasis ZooRun 10k Saturday morning to break the tape near the wildebeest pen in 30:51, some 45 seconds clear of the field. The women’s race was much more competitive as Ethiopian-Canadian newcomer Boneshi Woldegorgis (36:12) played a cat and mouse game with Waterloo’s Erin McClure, stalking her most of the way before surging ahead for the win over the final kilometre.

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10 tips for a successful road race

By | Toronto Waterfront 10K | No Comments

With all of the training and planning for your upcoming race, it’s easy to miss some of the small details along the way. Here are a few tips to ensure you’re prepared for a successful race day!

1. Run or bike the course.
Checking out the course beforehand will help you mentally prepare for race day. You’ll know what to expect and where the hills are.

2. Nothing new on race day!
This includes fuel! Have a familiar breakfast on race day, something you’ve had during your training that sits well in your stomach. It’s also a good idea to try out the fuel that will be available on course during the race.

3. Train at the time of the race.
As much as possible, complete your long training runs around the same time as the race will be, particularly if you aren’t a morning runner. Your muscles and your mind will be better prepared on race day.

4. Hydrate properly!
Having a set hydration plan will set you up for success. This includes pre-race hydration (including how much you drink the day before your race), as well as which aid stations you’ll stop by to re-hydrate with Nuun. Remember to plan for recovery hydration as well!

5. Have multiple goals.
Your “b” goal should be slower than your “a” goal, and your “c” goal should be to have fun! Having multiple goals means you still have a target to keep you going, no matter how you’re feeling during the race.

6. Then tell someone!
If you need help holding yourself accountable, tell your goals to a friend. Saying them out loud makes them real, and you’ll also have a friend that will check in with you to help keep you on track.

7. Wear extra layers at the start line.
It can be cold at the start of a race. Grab some old clothes to wear as extra layers at the start line, then shed them before the race begins. You’ll stay warm without overdressing for the race.

8.  Avoid aid station bottlenecks.
Head to the end of the aid station to avoid the large crowds. And no, you don’t need to learn to run and drink at the same time from those small cups. It’s okay to slow down to a walk, just remember to pull over to the side.

9. You can’t bank time.
You might think that you can “bank” time by running extra fast in the beginning, but it doesn’t work that way. Running too fast in the beginning will just tire you out.

10. Find your mantra.
Having a positive mantra will help you power through the harder parts of the race. Don’t be afraid to say/shout it out loud!

See you out there!